Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 11:17 UTC
Games A lot of interesting stuff on the internals of one of the greatest games of all time: Pac-Man. First, recreating Pac-Man in a day. Second, a very detailed look at the artificial intelligence of each of the game's ghosts. As it turns out, each ghost had its own 'character' and approached Pac-Man in its own unique way. Third, the Pac-Man Dossier, the most detailed study of the game ever.
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RE[2]: Been there...
by deathshadow on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 18:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Been there..."
deathshadow
Member since:
2005-07-12

I really think that if you need a 'license' when giving something away, you're not giving it away; particularly since copyright should provide all the protection one should need in terms of credit being given where credit is due.

But then, I get along with the Church of Stallman re-re's and their calling socialism "freedom" about as good as I get along with slavers and racists; which is to say I have a shoot on sight order in place.

... because if you need a 'license' that is larger than the forming document of most world governments to 'protect' something you are sharing "openly", well... as I've said many times does the term snake oil ring a bell? The FSF's commie rhetoric being so full of the seven cornerstones of propaganda Goebbels would wet his pants in envy. I often feel someone needs to explain to the FSF what 'freedom' is, because their nonsense isn't it.

Edited 2013-04-02 18:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Been there...
by Laurence on Wed 3rd Apr 2013 08:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Been there..."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I really think that if you need a 'license' when giving something away, you're not giving it away; particularly since copyright should provide all the protection one should need in terms of credit being given where credit is due.
Software licenses like GPL and BSD are not contracts, they're just explaining what terms of copyright you waver (ie you're saying people are free to copy and create derivative works, which would normally be illegal under most nations copyright law). What you're thinking of is EULA's, but that's a whole other kettle of fish (as the saying goes)

So if the above was your sole reason for dismissing licenses, then realistically you should be a supporter as software licenses are there to state the terms of copyright law which you're asking for protection from, and the terms of copyright law that you're wavering.

Reply Parent Score: 2