Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Apr 2013 22:27 UTC
Google It's apparently browser engine day today. After Mozilla and Samsung announcing Servo, Google has just announced it's forking WebKit into Blink. Like WebKit, Blink will be open source, and it will also be used by other browser makers - most prominently, Opera has already announced it's not using WebKit, but Blink. Update: Courtesy of MacRumors, this graph illustrates how just how much Google contributed to WebKit. Much more than I thought. Also, Chrome developer Alex Russell: "To make a better platform faster, you must be able to iterate faster. Steps away from that are steps away from a better platform. Today's WebKit defeats that imperative in ways large and small. It's not anybody's fault, but it does need to change. And changing it will allow us to iterate faster, working through the annealing process that takes a good idea from drawing board to API to refined feature."
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iOS
by Lennie on Thu 4th Apr 2013 12:05 UTC
Lennie
Member since:
2007-09-22

Apple does not allow any other browser engines on iOS and Apple didn't seem all that committed to development of webtechnologies anymore.

So does this mean iOS is gonna be left behind more than it is already ?

Reply Score: 3

RE: iOS
by majipoor on Thu 4th Apr 2013 12:28 in reply to "iOS"
majipoor Member since:
2009-01-22

"... and Apple didn't seem all that committed to development of webtechnologies anymore."

Can you elaborate a little bit?

"So does this mean iOS is gonna be left behind more than it is already ?"

Can you elaborate a little bit?

Seriously, the amount of commonplaces one can read nowadays concerning Apple or iOS without any argumentation is amazing.

Edited 2013-04-04 12:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: iOS
by Lennie on Thu 4th Apr 2013 23:19 in reply to "RE: iOS"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Well, for starters they ones said their platform would be great for HTML5-apps, now they have the most restricted environment of any platform to run HTML5 apps on. And they don't allow any other browser engines on their platform.

They have no participation in the newest developments like the development of WebRTC or the HTML5-specs.

They have an editor at W3C with a Microsoft editor, but the HTML5-specs aren't really being developed at the W3C. Most of the text comes from the WHATWG.

That gives me the idea of less interest.

I could be wrong of course.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: iOS
by Tony Swash on Thu 4th Apr 2013 13:45 in reply to "iOS"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Apple does not allow any other browser engines on iOS and Apple didn't seem all that committed to development of webtechnologies anymore.

So does this mean iOS is gonna be left behind more than it is already ?


Stats on who contributes what to Webkit can be found here

http://techcrunch.com/2013/02/09/apple-and-google-still-lead-webkit...

Bottom line: Apple and Google contribute about the same amount.

Can't quite see how iOS could be left behind in mobile web rendering given this;

http://allthingsd.com/20130403/safari-still-winning-the-mobile-brow...

What's interesting is that not only does iOS and mobile Safari have a bigger mobile web share than all other mobile browsers combined but that it's lead over the others is actually increasing.

The reasons for the iOS domination of the mobile web are many and complicated but I suspect the biggest reason is the success of the iPad, and the relative failure of Android tablets to make much of a dent, because tablets are such perfect browsing devices. Everything seems to indicate that a significant proportion of iOS and mobile browsing comes from the iPad.

For some reason Google decided not to push the development of Android apps specifically designed for the tablet format and instead gambled (a gamble it appears to have lost) that scaled up Android phone apps would be good enough on smaller form factor tablets.

I also suspect that the relative failure of Android in the tablet market, a market crucial to Google given that tablets seem to dominate mobile browsing, was part of the reason that Rubin was dumped.

Reply Parent Score: 0