Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 21:06 UTC
In the News "Kay says that some gadgets with superficial Dynabook-like qualities, such as the iPad, have not only failed to realize the Dynabook dream, but have in some senses betrayed it. That's one of the points he makes in this interview, conducted by computer historian David Greelish, proprietor of the Classic Computing Blog and organizer of this month's Vintage Computer Festival Southeast in Atlanta (the Festival will feature a pop-up Apple museum featuring Xerox's groundbreaking Alto workstation, which Kay worked on, as well as devices which deeply reflected his influence, including the Lisa, the original Macintosh and the Newton). Kay and Greelish also discuss Kay's experiences at some of the big outfits where he's worked, including Xerox's fabled PARC labs, Apple, Disney and HP. Today, Kay continues his research about children and technology at his own organization, the Viewpoints Research Institute." A great interview with this legendary man.
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RE[8]: History
by hhas on Thu 4th Apr 2013 13:38 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: History"
hhas
Member since:
2006-11-28

TL;DR:

Stop making endless bloody excuses for all your problems, and start searching for concrete solutions for a change.

And the first step in that is taking a cold, hard look at both yourselves as individuals and the Linux community as a whole, clearly identifying your particular strengths and openly admitting your embarrassing weaknesses. Then ask yourselves: "How can we more efficiently and effectively apply the former, and what do we need to do to remedy/compensate/work around the latter?"

Like I say, culling and consolidating your myriad product lines and returning your architectural approaches to your original Unix roots would be good moves on the former front. And as to the latter, learn to detach your egos, and start speaking to and working with 'outsiders' on their (not your) terms: artists, writers, HCI wonks, brand image consultants, lateral thinkers, girls, etc. You never know what you might gain from the experience until you try!

Reply Parent Score: 2