Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Apr 2013 21:45 UTC
Apple "Thanks to 35-year-old documents that have recently surfaced after three-plus decades in storage, we now know exactly how Apple navigated around that obstacle to create the company's first disk operating system. In more than a literal sense, it is also the untold story of how Apple booted up. From contracts - signed by both Wozniak and Jobs - to design specs to page after page of schematics and code, CNET had a chance to examine this document trove, housed at the DigiBarn computer museum in California's Santa Cruz Mountains, which shed important new light on those formative years at Apple."
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Comment by TempleOS
by TempleOS on Thu 4th Apr 2013 19:45 UTC
TempleOS
Member since:
2013-04-03

I think you're on to something. Good job.

There are some interesting instructions that don't quite seem helpful. CMOVcc which moves conditionally. SETcc I think sets a byte to FF if a condition exists. I have no idea why they didn't set all 32 or 64 bits to FFFF or 0000.

How about you look at my compiler for optimizations? It's God's temple and He wants it perfect.

You might enjoy my compiler, once you see how machine code is manufactured, it's liberating!

http://www.templeos.org/Wb/Compiler/BackEnd.html

Nothing is more fun than optimizing code, expecially with a profiler or benchmark to work against. Code size in bytes is pretty good to optimize.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Comment by TempleOS
by Alfman on Thu 4th Apr 2013 20:36 in reply to "Comment by TempleOS"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

TempleOS,

You are going to annoy others if you keep spawning new threads like this ;) You clicked on "post a comment", but you should be using the "reply" link under the comment you're replying to.


"How about you look at my compiler for optimizations? It's God's temple and He wants it perfect."

I took a glance. Neat though it may be, I have my own projects I need to be working on.


"Nothing is more fun than optimizing code, expecially with a profiler or benchmark to work against. Code size in bytes is pretty good to optimize."

I like the challenge, but it's so far from anything I get paid to do these days that I find myself rusty at times. I almost feel dumber for having become a web developer ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by TempleOS
by TempleOS on Thu 4th Apr 2013 20:41 in reply to "RE: Comment by TempleOS"
TempleOS Member since:
2013-04-03

Web developers need human skills. I'd say over the past ten years, I've gotten more human skills and not technical. I like the Bible because it has so much wisdom. It occurred to me that wisdom and psychology are overlapping, many times.

Web developers can do A/B testing, so I'm told. :-) You would need lots of traffic and a certain shrewdness.

Reply Parent Score: 0