Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 5th Apr 2013 10:47 UTC
Games More and more evidence is pointing towards the next Xbox requiring an always-on internet connection in order to play any games - i.e., once you lose your connection, you can't play any game at all. Three minutes after losing your connection, "your" game will suspend itself and stop playing. Microsoft's Adam Orth took to Twitter to defend this anti-consumer practice, but he did so in the most ungraceful of ways.
Thread beginning with comment 557898
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[6]: Comment by Chris_G
by lucas_maximus on Sun 7th Apr 2013 18:35 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Chris_G"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I understand the difference. I just don't think it is as much of a problem as you think it is.

Also I was actually replying to people saying Microsoft will simply turn off support when the xbox 4 comes out.

Edited 2013-04-07 18:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by Chris_G
by aaronb on Sun 7th Apr 2013 20:48 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Chris_G"
aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

Microsoft have not had a great record in this regard, the most memorable was 'Plays for sure' DRM on WMA and MP3 downloads where the music has become unplayable if you do not have a copy of the licence file and a compatible player.

While this is not one of the worlds greatest issues (such as lack of access to clean drinking water), in the context of frivolous entertainment, random cut outs is quite high.

I guess many people just do not agree with buying a product which is designed to fail.

Out of curiosity, will you be purchasing an Xbox 720 (or what ever its officially called) if this DRM is indeed in console?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by Chris_G
by lucas_maximus on Mon 8th Apr 2013 12:16 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Chris_G"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Wouldn't really factor into my design whether the DRM was there unless it was found to be quite unreliable. We don't know that yet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Chris_G
by toast88 on Mon 8th Apr 2013 20:12 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Chris_G"
toast88 Member since:
2009-09-23

I understand the difference. I just don't think it is as much of a problem as you think it is.


Then you're simply not a gamer.

People who like video also like to play old video games. And, heck, I want to be able to play all my Nintendo 64 games I bought years ago even in 2030, provided that the hardware still runs fine (which certainly will due to it's simplicity).

No artificial limitation should keep you from gaming in the future.

It's just crippleware.

Adrian

Reply Parent Score: 2