Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Apr 2013 22:27 UTC
Google It's apparently browser engine day today. After Mozilla and Samsung announcing Servo, Google has just announced it's forking WebKit into Blink. Like WebKit, Blink will be open source, and it will also be used by other browser makers - most prominently, Opera has already announced it's not using WebKit, but Blink. Update: Courtesy of MacRumors, this graph illustrates how just how much Google contributed to WebKit. Much more than I thought. Also, Chrome developer Alex Russell: "To make a better platform faster, you must be able to iterate faster. Steps away from that are steps away from a better platform. Today's WebKit defeats that imperative in ways large and small. It's not anybody's fault, but it does need to change. And changing it will allow us to iterate faster, working through the annealing process that takes a good idea from drawing board to API to refined feature."
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RE[2]: Comment by vtolkov
by bassbeast on Sun 7th Apr 2013 22:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by vtolkov"
bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

I can provide the same kind of BS from MSFT about IE in the 90s...your point? Words are just that, its deeds that count. We'll have to see how much they change and how compatible it is with standards, if we start seeing "this site requires blink" we'll be too late so we have to be vigilant NOW.

BTW can we stop this "Microsoft was an evil genius" bit I've seen too many times about their history under gates? Because honestly the best they could be called would be a bumbling henchman that caught a break. if you look at the history of the company objectively every success is preceded by "And then the other guy did something REALLY dumb". Just look at IE owning the web for so long for an example...how did it happen? Some genius at Netscape decided to rewrite the browser at a critical time and made a giant crashy mess, so people were actually downloading IE because while it wasn't as nice as NS at least you could look at more than 2 pages in a row without a crash.

So I never understood why MSFT was looked upon as evil geniuses, if anything they were just blessed with REALLY stupid competitors. The freefall of the company can be directly laid on the fact this is 2013 and their competition isn't pants wettingly retarded. But you name ANY success they've had and I'll show you a "and then the competition did something REALLY dumb"...Xbox? Sony pricing the PS3 at $600 which was twice what the market would bear. MS Office? Wordperfect ignored Windows and put out a lame DOS port that sucked resources and crashed a lot. Windows? Apple was run by one bad CEO after another that stuffed the channel with junk while BeOS stuck with one failed CPU after another and by the time they realized X86 was gonna win it was too late.

So we really need to kill the whole "evil genius" myth as history just doesn't bear it out. All those memos with buzzwords like "EEE" sure sound good but in reality it was just a company trying to sound like what they did on accident was really on purpose. I mean what did you expect them to say? "Wow we sure got lucky the competition was so dim"?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by vtolkov
by zima on Wed 10th Apr 2013 21:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by vtolkov"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Some genius at Netscape decided to rewrite the browser at a critical time and made a giant crashy mess, so people were actually downloading IE because while it wasn't as nice as NS at least you could look at more than 2 pages in a row without a crash.

It was caused more by a race towards new features (at the expense of fixing bugs) during the first browser war, not any large rewrite. The old Netscape was generally poorer than IE, and in rapid decline during the relevant timespan:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Browser_Wars.svg

Edited 2013-04-10 21:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2