Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Apr 2013 16:59 UTC
Internet & Networking Peter Bright has summarised some of the post-fork discussions on the WebKit mailinglists. "Now that Google is going its own way and developing its rendering engine independently of the WebKit project, both sides of the split are starting the work of removing all the things they don't actually need. This is already causing some tensions among WebKit users and Web developers, as it could lead to the removal of technology that they use or technology that is in the process of being standardized. This is leading some to question whether Apple is willing or able to fill in the gaps that Google has left." There's a clear winner and loser here.
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RE[5]: Different question?
by _txf_ on Mon 8th Apr 2013 20:40 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Different question?"
_txf_
Member since:
2008-03-17

Not really the case looking at the graph you yourself posted.
http://cdn.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/04/commits.png

Might want to have your eyes checked out.


Apple is the blue one on the bottom. You can't quite say they were tapering off, but rather, google's contribution increased massively over apples.

What that graph doesn't show is the percentage contribution of common infrastructure like WebCore vs browser specific code...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[6]: Different question?
by cdude on Tue 9th Apr 2013 13:31 in reply to "RE[5]: Different question?"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Well, the WebKit2 architecture was done by Apple and merged in and improved over time. That is work outside of the tree and later time-intensive fixing and maintainence that are not visible in such a diagram. Same for Google's massive 1GB test suite for Chrome/V8 which is probably a higher segment in there diagram color but got removed with Blink.

Save is only to say something changed. Two WebKit's. Now I am waiting for those that complained weeks ago, when Opera joined WebKit, that there are to less independent browser engine implementations to raise and praise this new situation. Seems they are all in holidays.

Edited 2013-04-09 13:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3