Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Apr 2013 22:21 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless The reviews are universally positive, and virtually everyone seems to agree: the HTC One is one heck of an Android device, and quite possibly the best phone currently on the market. Outstanding build quality, great design, fast - and just like the One X before it, it looks like to me it's a far better phone than its Galaxy counterparts. Why, then, is no one buying HTC phones?
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Advertising.
by VistaUser on Mon 8th Apr 2013 22:28 UTC
VistaUser
Member since:
2008-03-08

I Q2 2012, HTC, having run into financial trouble made it first savings cut in a critical place - advertising.

It did the last thing it should have done, especially as that was also when Samsung decided to massively increase its advertising.

The end result was that even though HTC had a top notch phone, its marketshare plunged from its previous share when it had not as spectacular phones. Samsung increased its advertising and took over the Android world.

The more people know about a product, the more they will consider it so HTC really need to ramp up spending on advertising, but it will take time to get past their mistakes last year when they lost mindshare and marketshare.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Advertising.
by gan17 on Mon 8th Apr 2013 22:42 in reply to "Advertising."
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

What he said.

Samsung's bludgeoning HTC (and almost every other Android maker) in the advertising space. Yes, Samsung ads are mostly corny, but they still generate massive exposure for them.

Add to that the fact that Samsung usually uses it's financial muscle to build bigger booths (and pay floor management for central positions for those booths) at most of the tech hyper-stores.

I'd wager Samsung also have the most ads floating online, whether they be via sponsorship (like the Verge had in the past) or ad-sense banners.

Shame, really. I think HTC make more attractive devices than Samsung. If I were in the market for a non-Nexus Android superphone (which I'm not, thankfully) the HTC one would be my first choice.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Advertising.
by Tony Swash on Tue 9th Apr 2013 10:22 in reply to "RE: Advertising."
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Over at the excellent Asymco site there is a interview with Rafael Barbosa Barifouse of Redacao Epoca about Samsung. In the interview he puts forward three reasons for Samsung's success compared to companies like HTC.

http://www.asymco.com/2013/04/07/samsung-vs-google-an-interview-wit...

Here is the relevant excerpt from that interview:


In my opinion it’s [Samungs success] due to three reasons:

Distribution. Success in the phone business depends in having a relationship with a large number of operators. Samsung had these relationships prior to becoming a smartphone vendor [because it sold all other kinds of phones]. Few alternative Android vendors have the level of distribution Samsung has. For comparison Apple has less than half the distribution level of Samsung and most other vendors have less than Apple.

Marketing and promotion. Samsung Electronics spent nearly $12 billion in 2012 on marketing expenses of which $4 billion (est.) was on advertising. Few Android vendors (or any other company) has the resources to match this level of marketing. For comparison, Apple’s 2012 advertising spending was one quarter of Samsung’s.

Supply chain. Samsung can supply the market in large quantities. This is partly due to having their own semiconductor production facilities. Those facilities were in a large part built using Apple contract revenues over the years they supplied iPhone, iPad and iPod components. No Android competitors (except for LG perhaps) had either the capacity to produce components or the signal well in advance to enter the market in volume as Samsung did by being an iPhone supplier.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Advertising.
by kaiwai on Fri 12th Apr 2013 12:37 in reply to "Advertising."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I Q2 2012, HTC, having run into financial trouble made it first savings cut in a critical place - advertising.

It did the last thing it should have done, especially as that was also when Samsung decided to massively increase its advertising.

The end result was that even though HTC had a top notch phone, its marketshare plunged from its previous share when it had not as spectacular phones. Samsung increased its advertising and took over the Android world.

The more people know about a product, the more they will consider it so HTC really need to ramp up spending on advertising, but it will take time to get past their mistakes last year when they lost mindshare and marketshare.


The lack of timely updates and upgrades doesn't help the situation either - it isn't just about 'new features' it is also providing prompt updates to address security holes or known bugs that make the experience with their phones less than pleasant. You'll never complete against Samsung in terms of marketing muscle but what you can do is put on a damn solid product and really work with carriers when it comes to training staff and the benefit of the carrier not having to deal with customers unhappy about their smart phone experience because the handset vendor fails to get their act together and provide fixes and updates in a timely manner. Here we are in 2013 and their HTC One X still hasn't received the 4.2 update let alone 4.1 with the excuses still being created - doesn't speak to highly of those customers who spent $799 for a phone that HTC can't be bothered supporting.

Regarding the reason I haven't gone for Android let alone HTC - HTC has refused to provide a synchronisation tool - so either I have a choice of a Samsung which refuses to provide a version compatible with Mac OS X 10.8 or HTC which provides no software for Mac users hence my only choice in terms of smart phones is the iPhone 5. I want choice but goddamit is it too much to ask to create a basic synchronisation tool like Microsoft has done with its Windows Phone 8 (btw, I have swore off Windows Phone 8 after a negative experience with the Nokia Lumia 920 I had).

Reply Parent Score: 2