Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Apr 2013 21:16 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "A recent poll by MKM Partners reveals that an overwhelming 83% of Americans do not know that BlackBerry has launched their new BlackBerry Z10 smartphone or new Blackberry 10 platform. The company's trouble does not just include marketing woes. The Wall Street Journal reports that over 50% of customers have returned their BlackBerry smartphones after trying out the platform. That is not to say that BlackBerry hasn't reached the top of any list. We learned today that BlackBerry is the most undesirable smart phone, learning that 71% of people would not consider the BlackBerry under any circumstances." BlackBerry denies the return rate figures, but that still leaves the others. This is devastating.
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Re:
by kurkosdr on Thu 11th Apr 2013 21:53 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

I will sound cliche, but is there room for a third platform? For example, all my purchased apps are in the Play Store. I don't have the apk files and cannot get them without some hacking, so chances are I 'll want to protect the money I 've spent so far by buying a phone featuring the Play Store again. Back in the days when apps were shipped in CDs/DVDs or as files, you could in theory build a compat layer like WINE (not that this ever worked in practice) and move to another OS, but now with app stores keeping your apps, you are officially locked in.

Most of the market share growth Android and iOS are posting (and Windows Phone to a lesser extent) is because they are getting users from the pool of Symbian/old Blackberry/feature phone users, which however is about dry up, not because they get users from each other (this happens, but it's rarer because of the lock-in). IMO once the pool has completely dried up by the end of 2013, it 'll officially be game over for any "third" platform. The last chance for all those "third platforms" (Blackberry 10, Ubuntu phone, WP8) was in 2011 and early 2012, too bad none if them bothered to show up.

Everyone from MS to RIM to Canonical keeps talking about becoming "the third platform", as if they are so certain such a thing can exist anymore. I wonder how many people returned their BB10 phones because they found out there was nothing interesting in the app store (because of developer indifference created by a lack of users/market share).

What is your opinion? Can there be a third platform?

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Reply Score: 5

RE: Re:
by ebasconp on Thu 11th Apr 2013 22:12 in reply to "Re:"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

Maybe some cheaper alternative for third world countries (South America, Africa) could turn (because of number of users) into a big competitor.

Otherwise, I completely agree with you.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Re:
by Moochman on Thu 11th Apr 2013 22:35 in reply to "Re:"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

I couldn't disagree with you more. The more platforms the better, I say. The world is a big place and even in the richest countries smartphones only make up about 50% of the market...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Re:
by Soulbender on Fri 12th Apr 2013 03:45 in reply to "Re:"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I don't have the apk files and cannot get them without some hacking, so chances are I 'll want to protect the money I 've spent so far by buying a phone featuring the Play Store again.


If everyone reasoned like this we would never have gone from vinyl -> cd -> digital.

IMO once the pool has completely dried up by the end of 2013, it 'll officially be game over for any "third" platform.


Any company who think that at some point they will have "won" will undoubtedly rest on their laurels and subsequently some new player will kick their ass.

The last chance for all those "third platforms" (Blackberry 10, Ubuntu phone, WP8) was in 2011 and early 2012, too bad none if them bothered to show up.


There's never a last chance in any market. Markets are always changing and developing and for those who think the race is over, well, lets just say "good luck with that".

Edited 2013-04-12 03:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Re:
by pandronic on Fri 12th Apr 2013 05:54 in reply to "Re:"
pandronic Member since:
2006-05-18

For example, all my purchased apps are in the Play Store.



I had the same fear when I switched to WP8, after two years of Android, so I took a look in Google Wallet where they show you all your app purchases. I had bought about 30 apps (I bought all the apps I used, even if they had a free, ad supported, version) and spent a total of 50 bucks. I can live with losing that money, it's not that much, like I had initially thought before looking.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Re:
by tkeith on Fri 12th Apr 2013 09:43 in reply to "Re:"
tkeith Member since:
2010-09-01

I will sound cliche, but is there room for a third platform? For example, all my purchased apps are in the Play Store. I don't have the apk files and cannot get them without some hacking, so chances are I 'll want to protect the money I 've spent so far by buying a phone featuring the Play Store again. ~ IMO once the pool has completely dried up by the end of 2013, it 'll officially be game over for any "third" platform. The last chance for all those "third platforms" (Blackberry 10, Ubuntu phone, WP8) was in 2011 and early 2012, too bad none if them bothered to show up.

What is your opinion? Can there be a third platform



I agree with you, people will not want to repurchase apps, but logically that doesn't make a lot of sense. You are paying hundreds of dollars for a new phone and thousands for the service. How much do people spend on mobile apps, $20-30? It shouldn't really matter, but it does.

Secondly, you are leaving out one of the biggest new markets, kids. Every year, a good chunk of people become "old enough" to get a smartphone. If a new OS became the new "cool thing" and was cheap enough, it could establish a market here. Sadly I don't see blackberry doing this though.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Re:
by sparkyERTW on Fri 12th Apr 2013 12:59 in reply to "RE: Re:"
sparkyERTW Member since:
2010-06-09

I agree with you, people will not want to repurchase apps, but logically that doesn't make a lot of sense. You are paying hundreds of dollars for a new phone and thousands for the service. How much do people spend on mobile apps, $20-30? It shouldn't really matter, but it does.


Holy hit-the-nail-on-the-head, Batman. People pay $50-60 a month - some even more - but balk at shelling out half of that once for what would likely be their entire app collection. Mind-boggling.

Admittedly I'm not huge on buying apps to begin with, but that's more because a) I'm not a big fan of proprietary software, b) half the time I feel like the app experience is a watered-down, broken version of a proper web-app or a desktop app that has been trimmed down to the point it's no longer useful, and c) 95% of the stuff is time-wasting games and social media, and I neither need to be a ninja of fruit nor do you need to know that I just "checked-in" at Beuaford's Bacon Boutique.

Reply Parent Score: 4