Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 14th Apr 2013 18:22 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Windows You can say what you will about Windows Phone and Windows 8's Metro interface (I refuse to drop that name) - it's inefficient, unpopular, cumbersome, beautiful, ugly, organised, clean, limiting - but there's one thing we can all agree on: it's unique and distinctive. CNet has published a profile of Microsoft's Albert Shum, the man behind Metro, and he highlights what I think is at the very core of Microsoft's problems in mobile right now.
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Comment by porcel
by porcel on Sun 14th Apr 2013 18:43 UTC
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

You may like metro, but the vast majority of the people that I have observed with a Windows tablet or phone find it cumbersome and less intuitive than Apple´s iOS or Android.

I have seen this in retail stores and at major channel distributors where retail outlets get their stuff and test it beforehand. The subjective experience of millions is what is condemning the Windows mobile platform, despite the huge amount of marketing money that a company as huge as Microsoft has put into it.

All in all, I think the cat´s out of the bag and people have finally seen that there is a world of computing to be had away from Microsoft´s wares and they are not looking back.

Interestingly, this is making many users more willing to try new things in the desktop as well. Once fear is gone and people begin to realize that other operating systems do exist and can get the job done, people begin to get curious.

We opened a small line of business transitioning people to floss operating systems and applications three years ago and have moved over 3000 business and home customers to linux without doing much advertising at all. Word of mouth is enough to get people in the door.

So, yeah, the cat´s out of the bag.

Edited 2013-04-14 18:45 UTC

Reply Score: 13

RE: Comment by porcel
by streetmagick on Sun 14th Apr 2013 19:03 in reply to "Comment by porcel"
streetmagick Member since:
2013-04-14

It's hit and miss for me desktop/mouse wise, but I like it on my surface. I haven't used a Windows Phone (or any smartphone for that matter. To hell with phones haha).

Not sure what "cat out of the bag" means. Although Metro is hit and miss, the only cat out of the bag to me is that Microsoft released something into the mainstream that eschews the older desktop icon paradigm. While we can argue it may not be executed greatly (I don't mind it), it does change the playing field a bit. Who knows what other interfaces will come into favor because of this? That's the only cat out of the bag. I'm willing to bet even Apple is considering some new ideas. And even improve upon the direction Microsoft is going.

BTW, this is my first post, but I'm a longtime lurker, and have owned Macs and PCs since my childhood in the early 90s. I'm just fan of computers in general. Just saying.. I'm not a shill. Seems like anyone who likes Windows is accused of being a shill these days ;)

Edited 2013-04-14 19:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Comment by porcel
by streetmagick on Sun 14th Apr 2013 19:23 in reply to "RE: Comment by porcel"
streetmagick Member since:
2013-04-14

Just to add to my previous comment, this conversation about platforms ultimately is neither here or there, for me. I think my attention has shifted to ecosystems. I like dabbling with different platforms, but what really wins me over and ties me down is an ecosystem. One reason I've been sticking with Microsoft strongly is their entire product line. I'm an Xbox fan, I use Office, I use Windows, and now even like Outlook.com more than Gmail. Hell, I even use a Nook, which is slightly aligned to MS. I would prefer a very neutral ecosystem where I can shift on dozens of devices and not feel out of place, but there isn't one (I used to think it was Google, but they become a huge platform in and of themselves).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by porcel
by bnolsen on Mon 15th Apr 2013 00:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by porcel"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

"childhood in the 90s" Well that puts you in a recent tech generation. My parents had their childhood in the 90s, they had to replace a laptop that recently broke and all I hear from them is bad bad bad about metro.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Weasel Words Much?
by HappyGod on Mon 15th Apr 2013 03:20 in reply to "Comment by porcel"
HappyGod Member since:
2005-10-19

It's always the vast majority isn't it? It's never just the majority.

And exactly how many people have you observed? 1? 2? 5?

Irresepective of your answer, the point is that you have observed an extremely small sample set of the people using the product, and it therefore doesn't matter.

The subjective experience of millions is what is condemning the Windows mobile platform


People are definitely not buying Windows phones. That's true enough. But that fact alone doesn't support any of your assertions.

There's no evidence to suggest that the handful of people that actually do buy MS phones don't like them.

It is my personal opinion (based on my own equally limited viewpoint) that people simply are not aware of Microsoft's offering. The people I know simply buy another iPhone or Android, and are surprised when they see the phone I'm using.

I regularly have to explain the difference between an S3, and my AtivS.

I've seen a few MS ads for the Surface, and one or two for the Lumia, but I think MS just needs to spend a bit of cash on advertising.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Weasel Words Much?
by shotsman on Mon 15th Apr 2013 06:13 in reply to "Weasel Words Much?"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

You obviously have not seen the amount of advertising that MS has done in the UK for their latest OS. Lots on TV. Full page spreads in newspapers and magazines etc etc.

Just go into the main High St retailer (Currys/PC World) and all you will see is Windows 8 on show. It is very rare to find anyone using it.

KB shortcuts are all right is you are right handed.
METRO is a complete waste of time as far as I'm concerned (on the desktop). This move towards full screen everything is a real PITA (IMHO).

No one I know has a good word to say for it.

I will continue to use Windows 7. When I can't do so any longer than it will be time for me to say 'bye-bye' to MS and I've been in Computing longer than MS has been a company. I will not use TIFKAM/METRO and there is not way anyone from MS can make me change my mind.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Weasel Words Much?
by chithanh on Mon 15th Apr 2013 10:19 in reply to "Weasel Words Much?"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

There's no evidence to suggest that the handful of people that actually do buy MS phones don't like them.

Hard numbers are difficult to find because Microsoft does not disclose them. But it seems generally agreed upon that one metric (return rates) is not favorable towards Windows Phone.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Weasel Words Much?
by dukes on Mon 15th Apr 2013 20:45 in reply to "Weasel Words Much?"
dukes Member since:
2005-07-06

It's always the vast majority isn't it? It's never just the majority.

And exactly how many people have you observed? 1? 2? 5?

Irresepective of your answer, the point is that you have observed an extremely small sample set of the people using the product, and it therefore doesn't matter.

"The subjective experience of millions is what is condemning the Windows mobile platform


People are definitely not buying Windows phones. That's true enough. But that fact alone doesn't support any of your assertions.

There's no evidence to suggest that the handful of people that actually do buy MS phones don't like them.

It is my personal opinion (based on my own equally limited viewpoint) that people simply are not aware of Microsoft's offering. The people I know simply buy another iPhone or Android, and are surprised when they see the phone I'm using.

I regularly have to explain the difference between an S3, and my AtivS.

I've seen a few MS ads for the Surface, and one or two for the Lumia, but I think MS just needs to spend a bit of cash on advertising.
"

Actually people are buying Windows phones. But not to the numbers of an Apple or Android device. This is what gets people confused about platforms. Windows Phone has its own community thriving on several websites including Nokia's own.

Also what I see confusing people are sales numbers for the USA only. Nokia sells globally. Their Windows Phone sales has actually been pretty good for what they set out to accomplish.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by porcel
by bassbeast on Mon 15th Apr 2013 14:09 in reply to "Comment by porcel"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Its actually REALLY simple, while it may or may not work on a phone on a desktop? Its putting handlebars on a pickup truck and saying "You are a luddite if you don't embrace the innovation"...uhh, your "innovation" is not as good as what we had before and in many ways its very much worse and THAT is why people aren't buying it.

I mean the last conversation I had here over Metro pretty much nailed it when i pointed out how stupid it was to have shutdown under the icon that stands for options and people popped up saying "So THAT is how you shut it down" because before that they were going the long way around by logging out and getting to it from there.

If a bunch of geeks that spend their time playing with weird OSes (hence why we come to OSNews) can't even figure out how to shut the stupid thing down without just randomly pushing buttons, what chance does Joe Average have? Its NOT intuitive, its NOT discoverable, I have picked up even the more offbeat Linux DEs fairly quickly yet this OS had me beating my head against the wall. I could go on but i think this video says it better than I could..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTYet-qf1jo

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Comment by porcel
by zlynx on Mon 15th Apr 2013 20:09 in reply to "RE: Comment by porcel"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

And even looking for the shutdown option is wrong. You're supposed to use the power button. The button that is DESIGNED to Power On and Power Off the device.

Reply Parent Score: 3