Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 13th Apr 2013 20:14 UTC
In the News Martin Hedberg has interviewed Jean-Louis Gassee - founder of Be, Inc. and former Apple executive. We're looking at 45 minutes (part 1, 2, 3, and 4) of talk about operating systems an their future, so sit down, relaxe, and enjoy.
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RE[4]: Excellent!
by moondevil on Mon 15th Apr 2013 06:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Excellent!"
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

Also agree.

Open source is good for consumers, but not so if you are a company.

It always sounds great on paper, until you try to make a living out of it.

I am an open source fan, but I only make use of it if it makes business sense.

Not everything is server side code that can pay bills just by doing support contracts or consulting.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Excellent!
by Neolander on Mon 15th Apr 2013 15:46 in reply to "RE[4]: Excellent!"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Except for the fact that open source software does not have to be given away for free. With appropriate licensing, it should be possible to ensure that every owner of a piece of commercial software is given personal access to its source code, without being allowed to redistribute copies nor derivatives of it.

In fact, I have been trying for some time to get OSI approval on an OSS license that handles this use case. However, at this point, it still needs further lawyer review. People on the license-review mailing list have given me some pointers to this end, though, so hopefully I should be able to do that.

Edited 2013-04-15 15:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Excellent!
by moondevil on Mon 15th Apr 2013 17:25 in reply to "RE[5]: Excellent!"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

How is this different from the commercial software you get access to the source code, like game development middleware?

For me if you prevent any form of redistribution, it is commercial software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Excellent!
by kaiwai on Tue 16th Apr 2013 03:13 in reply to "RE[4]: Excellent!"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Also agree.

Open source is good for consumers, but not so if you are a company.


But how is it useful to me as a consumer? Take Android, if the whole stack from top to bottom (including drivers) was completely open source and every handset vendor released their drivers open source and merged it with the main kernel tree (along with every handset vendor having their devices unlocked) then I could see an argument of open source being pro-consumer abased on increased device longevity. The reality is however much different than the original claim - and many times the open source can and is poorly documented so even that doesn't guarantee compatibility can be assured if a closed source or a project wanting got use another licence (to create a compatible version) and maintain compatibility. Only well documented standards really over come that obstacle between implementation and compatibility.

It always sounds great on paper, until you try to make a living out of it.

I am an open source fan, but I only make use of it if it makes business sense.

Not everything is server side code that can pay bills just by doing support contracts or consulting.


Agreed (I'm even sceptical about subscription programmes for consumers so it'll be interesting to see how the whole experiment Microsoft is having with Office 365 turns out) but that comes back to the importance of having open standards - let vendors decide whether they want to be open source or closed source or some sort of hybrid but the more important part is open standards and preferably of a patent free nature. End of the day what should be important is from the consumers perspective they can create a document and send it to their friend and not have to worry about what office suite they're running or having a video format that is 'good enough' for 99.999% of people and can cover a multitude of devices whilst enabling anyone to implement it based on a set of documented and open standards.

Reply Parent Score: 2