Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 15th Apr 2013 22:44 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Almost exactly three years ago, I wrote about why OSNews was no longer OSNews: the alternative operating system scene had died, and OSNews, too, had to go with the times and move towards reporting on a new wave of operating systems - mobile, and all the repercussions that the explosion of smartphones and tablets have caused. Still, I was wondering something today: why aren't we seeing alternative operating systems on mobile?
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WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

If we ask why more indy OSes haven't showed up on mobile, my own opinion is that Vanders is on the money. Not only do locked, proprietary, and non-standard devices impede efforts to actually build an indy OS, but they also *severely* impede our ability to distribute one as well.


Also, I think most hackers are content to work on custom roms for their phone of choice. Which is a good thing, IMO. Why not build something that people can actually get some use out of, as opposed to a hobby OS that maybe 20 people would ever install. Even on PCs, I always considered them a waste of time, except for those who have an academic interest in them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TempleOS Member since:
2013-04-03

Also, I think most hackers are content to work on custom roms for their phone of choice. Which is a good thing, IMO. Why not build something that people can actually get some use out of, as opposed to a hobby OS that maybe 20 people would ever install. Even on PCs, I always considered them a waste of time, except for those who have an academic interest in them.



In other words, "please don't even think of anything not Linux or we will do you violence."

Reply Parent Score: -1

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

I think the biggest appeal of starting with the Linux kernel is that you, as an operating system designer, do not have to think much about what hardware you want your system to work with. They've done most of the homework for you already. You can instead focus on your user land experience or other areas.

If you also controlled the hardware on which your OS would run (such a closed system like the C64) then your job as an OS creator is a lot easier. Otherwise you have the very difficult job of writing/rewriting drivers for a lot of devices. The fact that these drivers have already been written and tested can save a LOT of time and frustration for potential users.

Besides, you could easily start with the Linux kernel and end up with an operating system that is completely unlike GNU/Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2