Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 15th Apr 2013 22:44 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Almost exactly three years ago, I wrote about why OSNews was no longer OSNews: the alternative operating system scene had died, and OSNews, too, had to go with the times and move towards reporting on a new wave of operating systems - mobile, and all the repercussions that the explosion of smartphones and tablets have caused. Still, I was wondering something today: why aren't we seeing alternative operating systems on mobile?
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kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

but programming in the past involved writing ALL your own code, no libraries or API's, without Google and using Assembler or other less modern languages.

Today a lot of stuff is pre-made and by Googling you can easily link those pre-build blocks to make something that works.


The older generation of computer programmers were shit compared to the even older generation who had to build their own transistors and circuits. They had no assembler, or even a keyboard and monitor.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I never said anyone was shit. My point is: doesn't all the pre-build stuff limit the need for logical thinking and problem solving.

As it's easy to create something that works one can assume a lot of rather dodgy coders have a coding job, because they have one eye in the land of the blind.

If one didn't have all the pre-build code one could not create something that works without actually knowing how to code.

I'm not saying any generation is better or worse. The best coders ever may be alive and among us right now, but the ones that would have had no job 10-20 years ago can have one now by linking pre-build blocks of code.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I never said anyone was shit. My point is: doesn't all the pre-build stuff limit the need for logical thinking and problem solving.


No, I have to disagree. For example jQuery lets me not have to worry about how I implement the event handler cross browser (until IE9 it used a different method). I can simply concentrate on dealing with the event.

I think now that we have a better understanding of some of the patterns in which we write code now and software development is better understood.

As it's easy to create something that works one can assume a lot of rather dodgy coders have a coding job, because they have one eye in the land of the blind.

If one didn't have all the pre-build code one could not create something that works without actually knowing how to code.

I'm not saying any generation is better or worse. The best coders ever may be alive and among us right now, but the ones that would have had no job 10-20 years ago can have one now by linking pre-build blocks of code


Trust me those types stand out like sore thumb. We had one that thought development was copy and pasting code off the internet ... he is no longer with us.

While you can do a lot without having to have a full conceptual understanding, in a decent organisation where people actually want to improve whatever they are developing ... these people tend to be de-hired.

Edited 2013-04-16 14:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

I don't mean to split hairs, but even in those days people who built their own circuits were generally known as electronics engineers and not programmers or software engineers. Any kind of software that they wrote usually was to provide minimal support needed to get their hardware work in a larger system. These kinds of software are usually referred to as firmware for this very reason.

If you think that firmware writers are good or capable programmers, then you should spend ample amount of time crufty BIOS code hell to see why a software engineering is a sorely needed discipline at that time.

Reply Parent Score: 4

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I don't mean to split hairs, but even in those days people who built their own circuits were generally known as electronics engineers and not programmers or software engineers.


Yes, but those electronics engineers probably had the same attitude to programmers as some of these older programmers have to today's programmers. And those older programmers probably don't think today's programmers should be called the same thing.

Reply Parent Score: 3