Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Apr 2013 16:37 UTC
Windows Microsoft's Terry Myerson, corporate vice president of Windows Phone, talks about the competition. "With iPhone, I sense that it's running out of steam. With iOS, [Apple] just added a fifth row of icons. Android is... kind of a mess. Look at Samsung - there's clearly mutiny going on. The only OEM making money off of Android is Samsung." There's truth to all these statements, which makes it all the more surprising that Microsoft appears to be unable to properly capitalise on them. Sure, WP appears to be doing well in a few select markets, but by no means the kind of success Microsoft and (Nokia) was banking on. Microsoft will pull through. Nokia on the other hand...
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Nokia is ready for Hospice
by tomz on Tue 16th Apr 2013 17:53 UTC in reply to "Comment by Nelson"
tomz
Member since:
2010-05-06

Aside from wishful thinking, what evidence? See any of the communitiesdominatebrands blog posts.

Nokia had over 50% of the market.
They had the N9 and N950 which were rated better than the iPhone.
They had the Ovi store across the world and was a huge ecosystem for Symbian alone.

Then Elop burned the platform. The one the company was standing on. And said they would go Windows Phone.

So the old Lumias can't run Win 8, so are a dead end.

The new ones have a negative desirability, that is anyone owning one will never get another.

I don't like this situation, but it is the truth. Look at Blackberry - it was supposed to be dead, but has a QNX based phone, their browser is so much better than anything on iOS or Android, and it works as a phone (not a computer pretending to be a phone). If Microsoft did that they might be better off now.

Microsoft needs to stop asking "How can this leverage our existing monopolies?". Even the iPhone - Jobs asked how can they build the best Phone - as a phone. The iPod touch came later! Maybe Microsoft can get better, but it will only happen when they make a better phone as phone instead of trying to push. The other phone manufacturers have abandoned this loser. Bill Gates has even noted how bad it is.

WinPhone is great if you have a Zune pass and XBox gaming credentials. Just like if you have lots of iTunes stuff, an iPhone is best. But not everyone does or needs it.

Microsoft is even stupid today. Google announced that Google Reader is going away. Would I switch to Bing Reader? As soon as there was a working link. I won't hold my breath. (Nor Yahoo, the other search-engines or providers, I won't even believe there would be an Apple Reader - and they came out with their own Maps app).

Reply Parent Score: 13

RE: Nokia is ready for Hospice
by Nelson on Tue 16th Apr 2013 18:05 in reply to "Nokia is ready for Hospice"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Aside from wishful thinking, what evidence? See any of the communitiesdominatebrands blog posts.


How can you continuously cite someone who's been consistently WRONG about EVERYTHING?


Nokia had over 50% of the market.
They had the N9 and N950 which were rated better than the iPhone.
They had the Ovi store across the world and was a huge ecosystem for Symbian alone.

Then Elop burned the platform. The one the company was standing on. And said they would go Windows Phone.


Are you inebriated? Symbian was in FREE FALL BEFORE Elop took over. Its part of the reason WHY Elop was brought to Nokia. Wtf.


So the old Lumias can't run Win 8, so are a dead end.


Windows Phone 8 devices are quickly beginning to outnumber Windows Phone 7 devices and in many regions are more dominant than WP7 devices.

That said, maintaining parity between WP7 and WP8 apps is not hard. The people who got their WP7 devices which you begrudge are actually very happy, because it reviews quite well.

That is, in actual reviews. Done by people. Sourced from Amazon, carrier websites, and other places. Windows Phones, every version, reviews really well.


The new ones have a negative desirability, that is anyone owning one will never get another.


Says who? You? Tomi consulting? He NEVER cites any credible figures tied to this stupid claim.


I don't like this situation, but it is the truth. Look at Blackberry - it was supposed to be dead, but has a QNX based phone, their browser is so much better than anything on iOS or Android, and it works as a phone (not a computer pretending to be a phone). If Microsoft did that they might be better off now.


Wtf? Blackberry is in a terrible position right now. Microsoft should follow them where? Off of a cliff?

The Windows Phone strategy is working, as I've outlined in my original comment.



WinPhone is great if you have a Zune pass and XBox gaming credentials. Just like if you have lots of iTunes stuff, an iPhone is best. But not everyone does or needs it.


Sure, but its part of Microsoft's goal as a software and services devices. If you don't want to play in Microsoft's sandbox, you are by no means required to.

Windows Phone has Nokia Music, Spotify, Pandora, Rdio, Last.fm, basically every streaming service under the sun. There is a wealth of choice on Windows Phone.


Microsoft is even stupid today. Google announced that Google Reader is going away. Would I switch to Bing Reader? As soon as there was a working link. I won't hold my breath.


Others have already stepped up to do this, including ones which were already competitors to Google Reader. Microsoft doesnt have to compete in every segment, certainly not ones which you deem necessary.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

"Aside from wishful thinking, what evidence? See any of the communitiesdominatebrands blog posts.


How can you continuously cite someone who's been consistently WRONG about EVERYTHING?
"

Well, I don't know which blog he's referring to, but you're the OP is still very wishful in his thinking.


"
Nokia had over 50% of the market.
They had the N9 and N950 which were rated better than the iPhone.
They had the Ovi store across the world and was a huge ecosystem for Symbian alone.

Then Elop burned the platform. The one the company was standing on. And said they would go Windows Phone.


Are you inebriated? Symbian was in FREE FALL BEFORE Elop took over. Its part of the reason WHY Elop was brought to Nokia. Wtf.

"

Symbian was in free fall in the US market only.
It was still the predominate platform in the rest of the world - especially the emerging markets: India, China, etc.

There's a reason that one of the other partner companies in Symbian stood up and said "we're taking over" to service those markets - where its still tremendously successful.

Meanwhile, Nokia went from having well over 80% global market share in the entire cell phone industry to having well under 10% within 2 years of Elop taking the helm.


"
So the old Lumias can't run Win 8, so are a dead end.


Windows Phone 8 devices are quickly beginning to outnumber Windows Phone 7 devices and in many regions are more dominant than WP7 devices.

That said, maintaining parity between WP7 and WP8 apps is not hard. The people who got their WP7 devices which you begrudge are actually very happy, because it reviews quite well.

That is, in actual reviews. Done by people. Sourced from Amazon, carrier websites, and other places. Windows Phones, every version, reviews really well.
"

When people are paid to review them. And yet, WP8 devices are quickly finding themselves out of support too...good luck with that.

"
I don't like this situation, but it is the truth. Look at Blackberry - it was supposed to be dead, but has a QNX based phone, their browser is so much better than anything on iOS or Android, and it works as a phone (not a computer pretending to be a phone). If Microsoft did that they might be better off now.


Wtf? Blackberry is in a terrible position right now. Microsoft should follow them where? Off of a cliff?

The Windows Phone strategy is working, as I've outlined in my original comment.
"

Windows Phone strategy is not working.
Since its release Microsoft has LOST market share in its segments, no gains to date. That's hardly working.


"
WinPhone is great if you have a Zune pass and XBox gaming credentials. Just like if you have lots of iTunes stuff, an iPhone is best. But not everyone does or needs it.


Sure, but its part of Microsoft's goal as a software and services devices. If you don't want to play in Microsoft's sandbox, you are by no means required to.

Windows Phone has Nokia Music, Spotify, Pandora, Rdio, Last.fm, basically every streaming service under the sun. There is a wealth of choice on Windows Phone.
"

Spotify, Pandora, Rdio, Last.FM...they're all on Android and iOS as well. And from what people have been saying, the experience using them on WP8 is horrendous.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Nokia is ready for Hospice
by hhas on Wed 17th Apr 2013 11:49 in reply to "Nokia is ready for Hospice"
hhas Member since:
2006-11-28

Then Elop burned the platform. The one the company was standing on. And said they would go Windows Phone.


As a rookie CEO, Elop made one of the great classic mistakes in business: announcing a new product to replace its existing product way before the new product was actually ready to ship, aka the Osborne Effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect).

He was absolutely right that Symbian was nearing the end of its useful life while the competition was accelerating ahead buoyed by Android and iOS. But this is not something you want to shout out loud so you panic the shareholders and lose customer confidence.

Switching to Windows Phone wasn't the problem, nor was burning Symbian; both were solid business decisions and (IMO) the best choices under the circumstances. The mistake was doing them in totally the wrong order: Elop should've waited till the Nokia+WP platform was hitting the shelves, then set fire to the dreary old Symbian platform to get all the existing Nokia customers to jump to its exciting new WP platform, instantly bootstrapping the whole show. But without that new platform to jump to, existing Nokia customers naturally bailed for the next nearest option: its competitors products instead.


Like I say, a noobie error. Elop's really quite lucky to have kept his job, but I guess all the damage was done so Nokia didn't have much alternative than to tough it through and hope that his long-term vision would make up for his short-term strategy blunder. And it's certainly possible to bring a company back from much worse: look at the remarkable Jobs Mk2 turnaround of Apple, for example. Now that Nokia's new WP products are out, they certainly deliver on their original promise in technical terms, e.g. the 620 gets top reviews and is an absolute steal at the price. But as I said in an earlier post, the real challenge now for Nokia is convincing customers exactly why they want a Nokia phone instead of one of the 'safer' (i.e. Android-based) options.

And since they can no longer rely on customers to buy Nokia phones just because they're Nokia (at least not until the brand itself is fully rebuilt), they are really going to have to work hard on their presentation and sales tactics. This is especially the case on third-party shop floors, where they seriously need to take a leaf out of Apple's marketing manual, don a pair of brass ones, and loudly promote their handsets' 'differentness' as a feature rather than a risk. Which means ponying up for dedicated displays to show their entire lineup as a strong, coherent identity, rather than leaving stores to spread their products across their shelves according to price point, leaving them swamped by a sea of me-too Android devices.

And I think this'll be Elop's real test, because if he can be half the sales tactician the post-wilderness Jobs was then I think both Nokia the company and Nokia the brand will eventually bounce back just fine. If not, eh, time will tell.

Reply Parent Score: 2