Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Apr 2013 17:30 UTC
Google "The first Google-influenced Motorola phones will start to appear in the second half of 2013, Wicks said, and if you like smaller form-factor devices or stock Android, you're going to be excited." This is exactly what the market needs, to be honest. Stock Android phones straight from Google that aren't Nexus devices. Nexus devices are nice, but are available in a limited set of countries only, and the Nexus 4 is continuously out of stock. Hopefully Motorola will do a better job on the availability front.
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RE: Re:
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 20:03 UTC in reply to "Re:"
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

Since Android's internal file system is slowly turning into ext4, I'm wondering when ext4 formated micro-SD cards will appears and become the de-facto standard, replacing fat32 and exfat.

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Re:
by lucas_maximus on Tue 16th Apr 2013 21:48 in reply to "RE: Re:"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Never

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Re:
by Lobotomik on Wed 17th Apr 2013 08:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

I hate to agree with you on this, though it could be different.

It is really unfortunate: A mediocre and expensive filing system will be the standard for high capacity cards, when ameras, media players, tablets, phones and computers could all share a free, high performance filing system.

If Apple had any interest in external media, it could be pulled together. It need not even be a Linux original FS, it could be one of the FreeBSD filing systems which Apple already supports and are also supported by Linux kernel. It could be jointly marketed by mostly everybody that makes consumer electronics, be it cellphones, tablets, cameras or whatever.

Hardly anybody is using cards over 32GB yet, and that is probably because of the costs associated with licensing and porting Microsoft's FS for flash cards. If a new, free, Fs were introduced, it would not inconvenience users yet if new devices offered to reformat the cards.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Re:
by Athlander on Wed 17th Apr 2013 09:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
Athlander Member since:
2008-03-10

Never


Very probably true, but maybe Google will say sdcards have to be formatted to ext4. Using the device as USB storage will allow some degree of file transfer and there could be a warning that directly using sdcards formatted by the device "will not be compatible with Windows. #dealwithit."

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Re:
by JAlexoid on Wed 17th Apr 2013 10:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Correct.

All thanks to Microsoft for pushing exFAT as a mandatory piece of SDXC spec.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Re:
by robmv on Wed 17th Apr 2013 22:24 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
robmv Member since:
2006-08-12

Why not?, the first Windows Phone hardware used a SD Card with an internal format and the documentation said that the SD Card was designed to be used only with the phone, not to be extracted and use on other devices

If they do exactly that, promote the SD Card only as an expansion for the phone but not as an interchange format, and continue to use MTP to access it, there shouldn't be any problem. In practical use a lot of people use the SD Card as a permanent expansion for their phone. I don't see people moving cards from their camera to their phones, it is a good use case but if you want to avoid Microsoft trollish patents, you need a compromise

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Re:
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 16th Apr 2013 23:11 in reply to "RE: Re:"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

lucas_maximus is probably right on this one (never), but for flash storage you're better off using a simpler native file system (with no journaling) like ext2. Of course, that will probably never happen either... but if my phone supported ext2, my SD card would be formatted with it now. I already tried; Android stubbornly could not understand its kernel's own native file system.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Re:
by tidux on Wed 17th Apr 2013 00:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Actually ext4 was second only to FAT32 in a filesystem benchmark on generic USB sticks. It's faster and safer, and unless you're beating the living hell out of your USB flash drive journaling isn't a big issue.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Re:
by dsmogor on Wed 17th Apr 2013 18:16 in reply to "RE: Re:"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

The only thing that could trounce fat dominance is some kind of genious, reconfigurable thin fs layer over NAND that would make existing devices speed up considerably and live longer.
And only if MS endorses it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Re:
by darknexus on Wed 17th Apr 2013 20:02 in reply to "RE: Re:"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Since Android's internal file system is slowly turning into ext4, I'm wondering when ext4 formated micro-SD cards will appears and become the de-facto standard, replacing fat32 and exfat.

Kochise

It won't. Nothing save Linux and FreeBSD support EXT4 without the user needing to install drivers, so unless Google creates an MSC layer between the USB connection and the filesystem as opposed to exposing the filesystem directly, that will never happen. The two dominant systems do not support EXT4 out of box, therefore EXT4 will not become the default. To do otherwise would introduce extra steps for the users, and invalidate the Android user base's claim that Android phones act as an external drive with no additional drivers. Isn't that one thing you guys love to say, as opposed to iOS or WP8?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Re:
by phoenix on Wed 17th Apr 2013 21:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It won't. Nothing save Linux and FreeBSD support EXT4 without the user needing to install drivers, so unless Google creates an MSC layer between the USB connection and the filesystem as opposed to exposing the filesystem directly, that will never happen.


You mean, exactly like how PTP/MTP work, which is the standard in AOSP 4.x, and one of the reasons Nexus devices no longer support SDCards? ;)

To do otherwise would introduce extra steps for the users, and invalidate the Android user base's claim that Android phones act as an external drive with no additional drivers.


More and more Android vendors are moving away from USB Mass Storage and to MTP-only, so it's only a matter of time before this is the standard method for accessing files on Android devices.

Reply Parent Score: 2