Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 12:10 UTC
Windows The Verge confirms an earlier story by Mary Jo Foley. "Microsoft is preparing to revive the traditional Start button it killed with Windows 8. Sources familiar with Microsoft's plans have revealed to The Verge that Windows 8.1 will include the return of the Start button. We understand that the button will act as a method to simply access the Start Screen, and will not include the traditional Start Menu. The button is said to look near-identical to the existing Windows flag used in the Charm bar."
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RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 17:03 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

It's hard to imagine people buying Windows 8 and not being able discover it either by themselves or with help AND then upgrading to Windows 8.1.


Yeah, that might be unlikely, but I was thinking more of the people trying it for the first time and getting frustrated by it. I think they would have better luck if there was a start button. I was watching tv with a non tech friend, and they literately shouted at the tv when some ad described windows 8 as "easy to use".

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 18:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

One of my favorite lines: It's easy when you know how.

Windows 8 isn't difficult, but going from Windows 95 all the way to Windows 7 is almost zero learning curve. If you're a Windows 95 guru, frozen in time and revived many years later and shown Windows 7 you can operate it.

With Windows 8 there is more to figure out, mainly due to the Metro screen, which may probably prove very difficult for the less talented among us.

When I asked a co-worker what version of Windows she had at home she replied it was all strange so I knew it was Windows 8.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 19:10 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I had to explain to one of the guys in the office how quite a few features in Windows 7 worked, after he got an upgraded machine.

A lot of people didn't like the XP start menu, when it came out.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Agreed. Windows 8 isn't difficult, its just different.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by phoenix on Tue 23rd Apr 2013 17:21 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Forget "the least talented" users; most of our IT dept (granted, we're heavy Linux users) couldn't get to the friggin' login screen for 5-10 minutes! Ok, so this was with all the preview versions, which didn't include any of promised tutorial/first-run prompts. But when seasoned pros can't even get past the hidden "click-and-drag upwards in order to view the actual login screen" lockscreen, there's something wrong with the product.

And who puts a "lockscreen" on a desktop OS?

Only a single person (out of 14) in the IT dept has kept Windows 8 on their system, and they have it hacked up with a bunch of "give me the desktop experience; kill Metro" utils. The rest of us use XP or 7 when we need to access Windows.

Microsoft used to be really good at providing easy migration paths: Windows 95 included Program Manager; Windows 2000 borrowed the interface from Windows 98; Windows XP included Classic theme; Windows 7 allows you to turn off Aero.

Then, they throw Windows 8 at the masses, and completely remove or hide as much of the old system as possible. And they wonder why people aren't flocking to it in droves?

Reply Parent Score: 2