Linked by kap1 on Thu 25th Apr 2013 11:45 UTC
Java The Lightweight Java Game Library provides a simple API to OpenGL, OpenAL, OpenCL and Game Controllers enabling the production of state of the art games for Windows, Linux and Mac. Version 2.9.0 contains a complete rewrite of the mac backend, support for FreeBSD, new OpenGL/OpenCL extension and bug fixes. The library is used by many high profile games such as Minecraft, Spiral Knights, Revenge of the Titans, Project Zomboid, Starsector, JMonkeyEngine, etc.
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moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

People keep mixing up Java, the language, with the virtual machine that is part of the Oracle Desktop Java Runtime.

I miss the days people really had a clue about languages and implementations.

Nowadays one needs to explain that all the time.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

My guess is, that's because Java is a proprietary programming language where Sun/Oracle's runtime is the de facto standard while other runtimes are second-class citizen.

In almost all other widespread programming languages, you have a clear-cut and well-documented separation between what constitutes the programming language and what constitutes the platform behind it.

This way, standardized languages can exist independently from their creators, and implementations only differ by how well they implement the language and/or standard library. This is not the case with Java: in the unlikely case where Oracle would go bust tomorrow, the Java ecosystem would likely implode for lack of direction, although Google might manage to pull off a "Dalvik is not Java" and save the Android part of it.

Edited 2013-04-26 07:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

My guess is, that's because Java is a proprietary programming language where Sun/Oracle's runtime is the de facto standard while other runtimes are second-class citizen.


This is not true for any Java certified VM or native compiler.

Reply Parent Score: 3