Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st May 2013 09:29 UTC, submitted by matthew-sheffield
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless CEO of Blackberry Thorsten Heins said yesterday that he doesn't believe the tablet computer market is long for this world. "In five years I don't think there'll be a reason to have a tablet anymore," he tells Bloomberg News, "Maybe a big screen in your workspace, but not a tablet as such. Tablets themselves are not a good business model." If the dream of one device wirelessly interacting with all sorts of displays and peripherals comes to fruition, he may actually have a point.
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RE[5]: Right
by cdude on Wed 1st May 2013 16:02 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Right"
cdude
Member since:
2008-09-21

Heins comments are here to explain why Blackberry will not enter the tablet market

In a Blackberry context with a core-business of mobile and businesses a mass-consumer tablet with another focus (Playbook for gamers) is a very different story. Apple is consumer mass-market, Microsoft is. Blackberry? That's not where they make there money.

The real question I would ask is: if not tablets then what else? Is Blackberry smartphone only or are they working on whatever they identified as "next big thing" in context of there business strategy and since I am sure they are working on it, what is it?

Just stupid nobody asks that questions but questions that tablets could be replaced within next 5 years or tries to turn the thing often enough around to question a strategy Blackberry had and still has since years. But very best case is arguing that Apple has another strategy. My oh my.

Edited 2013-05-01 16:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Right
by jared_wilkes on Wed 1st May 2013 16:20 in reply to "RE[5]: Right"
jared_wilkes Member since:
2011-04-25

Blackberry, nee RIMM, was once an enterprise company. That market plateaued in the early aughts. The majority of their business and virtually all of their "growth" over the last 5-10 years has come from the consumer segment. It's no longer mid-level execs obsessing with clearing the red email status LED that are their core business -- it's 15 year olds in the UK, Brazil, and India using BBM.

The fact that they now need to serve two very different markets, one which is reliable and stable but small and one which has potential for growth but is based on a single feature and the economic constraints of its consumers is all the more troubling.

Edited 2013-05-01 16:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Right
by cdude on Wed 1st May 2013 16:27 in reply to "RE[6]: Right"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21