Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd May 2013 15:28 UTC
Internet & Networking Exactly twenty years ago, a document was published that played a huge role in establishing the web as we know it today. Twenty years later, and this simple and straightforward document is proof of an irrefutable fact: while closed technologies can change markets, open technologies can change the world.
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by jrash on Thu 2nd May 2013 17:10 UTC
jrash
Member since:
2008-10-28

This comment has been optimized for Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or higher. Please use IE5.5 or higher. ;)

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by zima on Fri 3rd May 2013 13:37 in reply to "This comment has ..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

One can wonder about that "while closed technologies can change markets, open technologies can change the world. [...] the web is one of the most important inventions in the history of mankind. It's right up there with the printing press and radio/TV" - wasn't TV field heavily patented? OTOH, maybe it took off only when the patents largely expired...

Skype might be borderline, too - I think in its short few years it changed a bit more than just markets, when enacting its great shift in long distance communication.

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RE[2]: This comment has ...
by leech on Sun 5th May 2013 05:00 in reply to "RE: This comment has ..."
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

- wasn't TV field heavily patented? OTOH, maybe it took off only when the patents largely expired...


Actually... funny story about that. I am actually related to Philo Farnsworth (I think he's my grandmother's uncle or something) at one point in time I'd asked why the whole family wasn't rich if he'd invented the television.

Turns out that while he had invented the core ideas behind it, long story short, he naively hadn't patented it so several companies kind of jumped on the gun him and... well the rest is history.

Patents, unfortunately, always screw over the actual inventor and end up only making bank for the companies that swindle the inventors.

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