Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 11th May 2013 21:41 UTC
Windows "Windows is indeed slower than other operating systems in many scenarios, and the gap is worsening." That's one way to start an insider explanation of why Windows' performance isn't up to snuff. Written by someone who actually contributes code to the Windows NT kernel, the comment on Hacker News, later deleted but reposted with permission on Marc Bevand's blog, paints a very dreary picture of the state of Windows development. The root issue? Think of how Linux is developed, and you'll know the answer.
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One can be aware, but culture runs deep
by tomz on Sat 11th May 2013 23:17 UTC
tomz
Member since:
2010-05-06

It was about a year ago, or was it two that someone explained Microsoft's version of decimation - the practice where under penalty every 10 roman soldiers would have 9 physically beat the 10th to death.

http://minimsft.blogspot.com/2011/04/microsofts-new-review-and-comp...

The other problem is they are more concerned about turning it into a DRM system or other political-marketing goal than something that is engineered well, so even "security" means hard to copy, not hard to exploit. "The browser is part of the OS". So it is mixed in with DLLs and the Kernel. Change the driver model - I don't know why, just do it so each new rev needs vendors to redo everything.

There is GMP - the Greatest Management Principle - you get more of what you reward. If you reward firemen who fix bad code emergencies instead of refactorers who insure there won't be any emergencies in their work, you will get firemen. If you create performance review games, you will get the best at playing those games.

There is no reason they could not continually beat Linux and be better other than they don't want to be - they reward other things. Look at how long IE languished until Firefox and the Webkit browsers started gaining enough share. Outlook and Hotmail? Now since "cloud" is the new buzzword, they are trying to pantomime Google and others (Apple isn't doing that well either, but their model broke - they need to have something completely new every year, and some won't work like Ping and Apple TV and others will take off - but while Google has Glass, Apple...).

In the W8/WP8 death knell, I note they have no W8 Zune - a very inexpensive entry unit that a developer could use for everything not involving a phone. Xbox is too far away from the rest of the ecosystem (hardware, XBLive, etc) to cross-pollinate. And even with their attempts to lock down with UEFI Windows 8, and prevent going retro instead of Metro, they damaged the PC market - it takes rare talent to kill your Cash Cow. Ballmer is considered the top CEO who should have been fired much earlier.

Just to contrast, Blackberry's new offerings from reports have double the battery life, the browser is better than anything from Android, it runs most Android apps, but also have other dev systems, has really good PC support and security and a QWERTY model - the predictions of their impending death were exaggerated. Its not hard, but it requires realizing what you must do when the world is changing around you and your monopoly is being eroded daily.

Then there's the comic attempt at Office - the "XML" version and their political manipulations to get that piece of trash spec that no version of Office actually supports adopted as an "open standard". ODF might be ugly and have gaps, but there's open source again. KDE, Open, and Libre Office manage to work.

The checkbook doesn't work with innovation. Apple tried it with their Maps. I'm not sure what they were thinking with the whole Windows 8 set of things - they look to be trying the ecosystem lock-in like Apple without the fanbois - either consumers or developers. They are trying hardware again - so there are lots of calls of "neat", then people go out and buy something else.

Hopefully they will right themselves before crashing. Apple is already in decline (suing Samsung over silly patents, but Microsoft is doing that to Motorola).

Perhaps they have enough patents and lawyers to freeze technology for a decade here while they live off licensing fees - Xerox did that with the photocopiers for a while.

Reply Score: 11

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Blackberry may not be a good example, at all. They are still losing market share, and that is not a good thing in a market which is growing overall very rapidly.

Edited 2013-05-13 21:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3