Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 12th May 2013 22:30 UTC
Windows "Microsoft's communications chief has a tough job these days, and with Windows 8 is under attack from all sides he's bravely called for a return to the center and a less partisan conversation about the new OS. There's just one problem: The periodicals he’s called out for engaging in 'sensationalism and hyperbole' are in fact right about Microsoft's strategy. And ignoring that is the real problem."
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Feedback
by WorknMan on Sun 12th May 2013 23:49 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

A tech company listening to feedback from geeks and the tech press is a fine art, where you really have to be wise enough to discern when you should listen to your detractors and when you should ignore them. Cases in point:

- The first time I saw a mention of the Nintendo Wii's new controller after they revealed it, the headline read 'Nintendo commits suicide.' It was the laughing stock of the gaming community, and everyone predicted the Wii would come in a distant third. They went on to sell about 100 million of those things, and you could hardly find one in stores for the first 2+ years after its release.

- When the iPad was first announced, geeks everywhere turned their noses up at it, saying 'Oh, this is just a big iPod Touch. It'll never sell ...'

So just because the feedback is initially negative doesn't mean you don't have a hit on your hands. Of course, in MS's case, they probably should've listened ;) But the point is, you never know ...

Edited 2013-05-12 23:51 UTC

Reply Score: 7

RE: Feedback
by ze_jerkface on Mon 13th May 2013 01:09 in reply to "Feedback"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

During the Windows 8 development period there were numerous comments from shop owners and admins that tried Win8 on users only to have overwhelmingly negative feedback.

Most of those comments were deleted.

Some negative comments were left to give some semblance of balance but in reality the blog comments were censored to serve the image of Sinofsky and Microsoft.

Those of us who followed the blog closely knew what was going on. Sinofsky was given full reign and that included trying to control public opinion. The most technically critical questions were deleted while comments like "I likey Windows 8" were left.

But I now see that our criticism was unwarranted. Windows 8 and Surface are a huge success. Windows developers were wrong and Sinofsky was right. The other day I had to wade through a Surface break-dance party. Some guy did a 10' backflip over me while handing a Surface to his buddy. True story.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Feedback
by Nelson on Mon 13th May 2013 03:04 in reply to "Feedback"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


So just because the feedback is initially negative doesn't mean you don't have a hit on your hands. Of course, in MS's case, they probably should've listened ;) But the point is, you never know ...


I think this is a good point. Feedback is a balancing act and no side will get exactly what they want. The Start Menu isn't going to come back. What might have a chance of coming back is the Start Menu's functions. What problems did it solve? How did it solve them? Why is the Start Screen worse? How could it be better?

These are likely the questions Microsoft asked itself. Windows Blue from the leaked builds appears to confirm this. There is *more* Metro, not less. Its more refined and works better from a Mouse+Keyboard, but it IS Metro.

My point I guess is that it depends on i you buy into Microsoft's core strategy. If you do, you'll find that Windows 8.1 advances that goal and makes it easier to use from a Desktop and within the enterprise.

However if you disagree with Microsoft's strategy, nothing short of a 360 in direction will appease you. Microsoft doesn't seem to be doing that.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Feedback
by WorknMan on Mon 13th May 2013 03:17 in reply to "RE: Feedback"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

My point I guess is that it depends on i you buy into Microsoft's core strategy. If you do, you'll find that Windows 8.1 advances that goal and makes it easier to use from a Desktop and within the enterprise.


I'm taking a 'wait and see' approach. I did not care for Metro at all on Win8, but I don't want to see a 360 happen either. For now, I'll give them the benefit of the doubt. If it's still ass in 5 years or so, we'll know they screwed up.

The traditional Win32 desktop is a clusterfuck of framework on top of framework. Even if they don't succeed, I applaud Microsoft for at least making an attempt to move on.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Feedback
by WereCatf on Mon 13th May 2013 05:46 in reply to "RE: Feedback"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

However if you disagree with Microsoft's strategy, nothing short of a 360 in direction will appease you.


If they did a 360 they'd be right where they are. You probably mean 180.

Reply Parent Score: 7