Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 18th May 2013 21:33 UTC
Google Why does Google get so much credit in the technology industry? Why, despite the company's many obvious failings, do many geeks and enthusiasts still hold a somewhat positive view on the all-knowing technology giant? A specific talk at Google I/O this week provides the answer.
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WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

So, you're trying to say that Google should have no right to shutter services they don't feel suit their purposes as long as those services are used by even just one person or those services are based open standards? That's just silly.


This is another perspective on the matter:
http://eschnou.com/entry/whats-next-google--dropping-smtp-support--...

I think it wouldn't be so bad if they were a little more transparent about certain things. For example, many of us Google Voice users can't help but wonder what its fate is. It hasn't had any substantial updates in awhile, and still doesn't have any sort of API, so things like the GV dashclock widget has to do some janky workaround just to read text notifications. And this goes double for Google+, which doesn't have a full read/write API either.

Like one of the comments on the above article said, it's like Google is talking out of both sides of their mouth. On one hand, they act like they're the champions of openness, but sometimes their actions don't show it.

Personally, I think the real reason why they're axing Google Reader is because it gives users direct control over what content they want to see, and Google as of late tends to be all about removing that kind of control.

Better to let them decide for you, based on what data they have collected about you, and whatever your friends are interested in. Rather than RSS, they'd rather push you into G+, which gives you absolutely NO control over what content is delivered to your stream.

Edited 2013-05-19 06:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Rather than RSS, they'd rather push you into G+, which gives you absolutely NO control over what content is delivered to your stream.


It doesn't? Why don't I ever see celebrity news there? Blog posts and the likes trying to push me to buy this or that? Why do I only see things I've deliberately chosen?

Reply Parent Score: 4

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

It doesn't? Why don't I ever see celebrity news there? Blog posts and the likes trying to push me to buy this or that? Why do I only see things I've deliberately chosen?


The only thing you can control is who can post in your stream. But you can't control the content. For example, I have a few people I follow for various reasons, but they're also rabid Nintendo fanboys, so it's not unusual for me to wake up to a dozen or more Nintendo posts in my stream every day. So why can't I set it up to hide any posts with the word 'Nintendo' in them? I don't give two shits about Nintendo, or gaming in general ;)

Worse yet, if I didn't block ads, they'd probably be showing me Nintendo/gaming-related ads all over the Googleverse, because that's what my friends like. Well, they're not even really my friends. They just happen to talk about a few niche-related topics I am interested in. We tried the Communities feature, but that was an epic fail.

Edited 2013-05-19 22:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

The thing about Google Reader is that they got f*cked by local gov-lobbying. France and germany introduced laws to cash them, cash those Reader services. 2 weeks late, once the lobby-law passed in germany, Google announced aborting the Reader. Thing is they never made much money with that services but to continue that services put them under permanent risk.

The bottom-line you will not read in any news since its the news-media who pushed for that law. If or how smaller RSS services may become target if there are not much $ to win from them stays to be seen.

Edited 2013-05-19 12:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

France and germany introduced laws to cash them, cash those Reader services.

I've never heard this before. Link to the news, please?
Also, if this is the case, why didn't Google close Reader just in those countries? It's trivial to implement and would show citizens effects of those laws.

Reply Parent Score: 3

pklausner Member since:
2009-07-23

cdude: you are mixing up things.

The "Leisungsschutzrecht" legislation in Germany affects Google News. They were supposed to pay if the snippets are too long. Interestingly they got off the hook with last-minute lobbying. With the recently passed law only small-time bloggers remain under threat because they cannot afford the court costs to settle the question "snippet short enough/too long?" on a case by case basis.

In France the issue for Google News was settled with a one-off payment to some "new media" fund.

Shutting off RSS aggregation is a clear move to kill interoperability. As with CalDAV. As with XMPP. Surely they think it makes business sense. Surely it should make you think about how far you want to trust their siren songs to lure you into their walled garden...

Reply Parent Score: 2