Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 18th May 2013 21:33 UTC
Google Why does Google get so much credit in the technology industry? Why, despite the company's many obvious failings, do many geeks and enthusiasts still hold a somewhat positive view on the all-knowing technology giant? A specific talk at Google I/O this week provides the answer.
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Comment by marcp
by marcp on Sun 19th May 2013 10:32 UTC
marcp
Member since:
2007-11-23

Say about Google what you want - and there's surely a lot of stuff to say - but it's this hacker-friendly attitude that earns this company its credits.


Hacker culture was [also] always about privacy, security and anonimity. Google isn't.
They pretend to be hacker-friendly just to make few more pennies out of the unsuspecting, clueless and naive newcomers.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Comment by marcp
by RshPL on Sun 19th May 2013 11:42 in reply to "Comment by marcp"
RshPL Member since:
2009-03-13

There is just one thing ... hackers do find Google friendly. I consider myself a hacker and if Google has always been friendly I find it a hacker friendly culture. Don't forget who makes Google tick .. Hint: it's not typical corporate Microsoft-like developers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by cdude on Sun 19th May 2013 12:30 in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Agreed. Also extra points for destroying Microsoft lockin. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by marcp
by Vanders on Sun 19th May 2013 11:43 in reply to "Comment by marcp"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Hacker culture was [also] always about privacy, security and anonimity.

It was? Got any sources on that? Because the MIT AI lab was an incredibly open place with no sense of privacy and certainly no concept of anonymity. A direct example is ITS, the first "hacker" Operating System, which had no passwords and no directory permissions. This was a deliberate design decision as a reaction to the security systems that were designed into CTSS and Multics.

"Hacker culture" has always been about transparency and openness, both things that Google does or does not do to varying degrees.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by marcp on Sun 19th May 2013 22:47 in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

True. That's the history.

However, that was not my point. There is an enormously huge difference between transparency, privacy, security and "hiding something". You can be transparent and stay secure, private, not hiding anything "bad".

I understand current american way of thinking about these problems: some people really push the vision of "terrorism" and that "if you hide something then you're a terrorist, you're not TRANSPARENT". That's not othe point I make.

First hackers faced different problems. There was no internet, no "evil guys" lurking inside your multi-user lab machine. There was just he, me and couple of other collegues. They could just happily hack on the code.
They trusted each other, because they knew each other personally. That is not the case today.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Comment by marcp
by some1 on Sun 19th May 2013 15:20 in reply to "Comment by marcp"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

From http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html

The problem with screen names or handles deserves some amplification. Concealing your identity behind a handle is a juvenile and silly behavior characteristic of crackers, warez d00dz, and other lower life forms. Hackers don't do this; they're proud of what they do and want it associated with their real names. So if you have a handle, drop it. In the hacker culture it will only mark you as a loser.

Doesn't sound like a lot of anonymity.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by marcp
by zlynx on Mon 20th May 2013 04:47 in reply to "Comment by marcp"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

Hacker culture was [also] always about privacy, security and anonimity. Google isn't.
They pretend to be hacker-friendly just to make few more pennies out of the unsuspecting, clueless and naive newcomers.

Depends on which hacker culture you're talking about. The original timeshare systems written by hackers didn't have any permission controls, on purpose, so that everyone could read and edit everyone else's files.

And none of the original internet protocols included encryption. That was all added afterward.

Reply Parent Score: 5