Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 18th May 2013 21:33 UTC
Google Why does Google get so much credit in the technology industry? Why, despite the company's many obvious failings, do many geeks and enthusiasts still hold a somewhat positive view on the all-knowing technology giant? A specific talk at Google I/O this week provides the answer.
Thread beginning with comment 562069
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: It's all about business models
by cdude on Sun 19th May 2013 12:42 UTC in reply to "It's all about business models"
cdude
Member since:
2008-09-21

the core development of Android can now shift into maintenance mode

Stop innovation and you get done. So, no, its not done and never will be. Starting with JB Google focused on specific actions. Performance with 4.1, security with 4.2 and now services. 4.3 will come, I think its focused on stabilization. 5.0 is work is progress. My guess is Project Butter 2.0 with focus on low-end. Maybe already with 4.3.

Point is 4.3 may just not be ready yet. There are enough indicators for 4.3 coming as incremental update. So, maybe just later this year.

Edited 2013-05-19 12:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Stop innovation and you get done.


Only if that relates to your core business. Android is not a core business of Google's, it's a cost centre. Android was a means to an end for Google, it was designed to protect Google's core business from the threat posed by the rise of a dominant mobile OS (seen originally as Windows Mobile and Rim and later as iOS) which might have excluded Google services. Android so far has sort of done that, it certainly prevented any alternative OS from dominating the mobile market, but it has been far less efficient at ensuring the inclusion of Google services and so the next phase of Google's mobile strategy will probably focus far more on making Google services ubiquitous across all mobile OS.

I think it was this sort of change of strategic emphasis that led to Rubin's departure.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Came across this article reflecting on Google' seeming change of emphasis around Android at the iO

http://techpinions.com/googles-android-and-the-path-not-taken/16118

It concludes with his


The battle for mobile is over. Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android reign as a duopoly and Microsoft and Blackberry hang on by the skin of their teeth. Google is free to put its web services on Android and iOS and to ignore the Blackberry and Windows 8 operating systems. Android has ensured that Google’s services are freely accessible on the only two operating systems that matter. The Android strategy was a success although, perhaps, at great cost. Google’s I/O keynote is living proof that Google is now re-focusing on their original mission of dominating web services.

Reply Parent Score: 3