Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st May 2013 21:38 UTC
Games At an event earlier today, Microsoft unveiled the next Xbox - the third model, but confusingly named Xbox One. The big focus was TV, integrated Kinect, and all the other stuff we all expected to be forced down our throats. I think it took them 25 minutes to actually come to what should be the core of the story: gaming. Nothing groundbreaking in the gaming department, except for how Microsoft intends to handle the used games market and borrowing games from friends: pay up, buddy!
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Comment by lucas_maximus
by lucas_maximus on Tue 21st May 2013 21:48 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

With the massive amounts of piracy I am not surprised.

Also it is a license per machine model that has been around with Microsoft forever.

It isn't really surprising.

Edited 2013-05-21 21:51 UTC

Reply Score: -3

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 21st May 2013 21:50 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

With the massive amounts of piracy I am not surprised.


Proof for console piracy?

Reply Parent Score: 6

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Chipping? Been around for ages in various forms.

http://www.xboxmb.com/forum/44-firmware-hack-tutorials/1965-flashin...

Every console so far has been able to be chipped via various methods. While at uni I made a lot of money actually chipping consoles (PSX and PS2).

We could do everything from play dodgy games to emulators of games on other platforms.

I don't do it anymore after I became a software developer and realized the amount of work required in making qualify software.

Edited 2013-05-21 21:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by AnXa on Tue 21st May 2013 23:32 in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
AnXa Member since:
2008-02-10

If you've ever been playing games online with the X■O, then you know that pirates and crackers were pretty much partying on that platform so much that it has almost killed the platform. Online matches are full of cheaters, and the act of running a pirated game on Xbox 360 is almost so easy that anykind of an idiot can do it. DVDs and easy to burn and the software has been cracked to run ISO images from external HDDs. The situation on the Wii is just as or even worse than this.

Publishers and developers were not ready to invest into the platform were it was more than certain that the game would get pirated. And that's why currently Xbox 360 has practically no flow for new exclusive games. Wii also suffers greatly from lack of the 3rd party titles.

The PS3's unauthorized software is also broadly available, but the device itself is still pretty difficult to pirate. This is due BD drive and the sheer size of the games only available for PS3. And a few other things. But it's still more or less easy to do if you know what you're doing.

The content ID system in X■1, and the way the DRM is handled in the new Xbox is in my opinion just the next step for Microsoft to try to prolong the upcoming battle against the crackers who want to run pirated games and cheat in online games and do controlled modifications. Not to mention the hackers who want to tinker with the box and run GNU/Linux on it and do homebrew software.

While the overall problem with the unauthorized copies of games and other software might be more significant problem on Windows-PCs, the problem exists for closed game devices as well, and it's getting worse with more people getting onto those devices.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

http://www.osnews.com/thread?562784

Well here we are.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by toast88 on Tue 21st May 2013 22:01 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
toast88 Member since:
2009-09-23

With the massive amounts of piracy I am not surprised.


They are fighting down the used-games market, not piracy, with this solution.

Buying games used is NOT piracy.

Piracy will always find their ways, such measures will hurt honest customers in most cases.

Adrian

Reply Parent Score: 9

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It also eliminates piracy. Killing two birds with one stone.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by bentoo on Tue 21st May 2013 22:42 in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
bentoo Member since:
2012-09-21

They are fighting down the used-games market, not piracy, with this solution.


This was really inevitable with major publishers (EA, Ubisoft, Sony, etc.) already charging for second hand copy access to certain features such as online play, or not allowing transfer/sale at all (Steam).

However, I'm not sure what stake Microsoft has in limiting the used game market. I have to agree with lucas that this is at least partially related to piracy and IP protection.

Piracy will always find their ways, such measures will hurt honest customers in most cases.


Actually, this hurts Gamefly, Redbox, and the like the most.

Reply Parent Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Buying games used is NOT piracy.


Check the articles in Games Developer Magazine, the industry is of another opinion.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Soulbender on Wed 22nd May 2013 02:31 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I don't see how this particular method is going to reduce that piracy though. It really does seem much more like a way to reduce the used games market.

Reply Parent Score: 6

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It ties the game to the account, a similar technique pretty much killed piracy with the original half life otherwise you couldn't play online (counter strike and Team Fortress was massive).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by bert64 on Thu 23rd May 2013 09:25 in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

That's the whole point..

Pirates are not willing to spend money, its a waste of effort trying to get them to do so.

Those who buy used games or lend their games to friends *are* willing to spend money, so you expend effort to screw more of it out of them.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by bert64 on Wed 22nd May 2013 06:33 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

So what they've done is screw people who just want to legitimately lend their games to friends...
Serious pirates will just wait for a mod to come out.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by ichi on Wed 22nd May 2013 16:02 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

With the massive amounts of piracy I am not surprised.

Also it is a license per machine model that has been around with Microsoft forever.

It isn't really surprising.


Do you know what wouldn't be surprising? That not allowing people to play legit games for cheap (rented, borrowed or second hand) led to an increase of piracy rather than the opposite.

The cost of owning a second console dedicated exclusively to pirated games is suddenly not such a luxury if you sum up the price of all the 5 hours long games you can rent, resell or exchange with friends for other equally short games in the current generation of consoles.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

The thing is that Microsoft aren't marketing this for hardcore gamers. They are offering it to casual gamers and put a load of Home Theatre PC Tech in which is what Samsung incidentally is doing with their SMART TV technology.

Most of the people I know that have Smart TVs are between 35-50 and like their gadgets.

Reply Parent Score: 2