Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd May 2013 13:38 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The Verge has learned that HTC's Chief Product Officer, Kouji Kodera, left the company last week. Kodera was responsible for HTC's overall product strategy, which makes the departure especially notable on the heels of the global launch of the make-or-break One. It's not just Kodera. In the past three-odd months, HTC has lost a number of employees in rapid succession." I really hope HTC pulls it together.
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RE: Comment by Nelson
by MOS6510 on Wed 22nd May 2013 14:22 UTC in reply to "Comment by Nelson"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

I think Nokia should have made their own OS, gone with WP or done both.

Certainly I agree Android was a no-go. It would reduce Nokia to just another phone maker, which would be sad for a company that was once synonymous with the mobile phone.

I'm sure Microsoft would welcome HTC and give them support if they're serious about WP phones.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Nelson
by Nelson on Wed 22nd May 2013 14:45 in reply to "RE: Comment by Nelson"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I think Nokia should have made their own OS, gone with WP or done both.


So far, I think the Nokia strategy is bearing out nicely. It is exactly what every level headed person thought would happen -- a gradual but noticeable improvement in Nokia's financial position and in their Lumia shipments over time.

Windows Phone is certainly reaching the point where it has been fully bootstrapped and becomes self sustaining, but we're not all the way there yet.

I think for Nokia, Q2 and Q3 leading into Q4 will be pivotal for them. Its make or break now, they have their full portfolio with a competent OS. They just need to seal the deal.

I'm optimistic about Q2 given Nokia's own guidance last quarter, but Q3 remains a mystery. If they can keep momentum up into Q4 they'll do very well for themselves.


Certainly I agree Android was a no-go. It would reduce Nokia to just another phone maker, which would be sad for a company that was once synonymous with the mobile phone.


It's not just that, Nokia simply wouldn't have had the money to do the large scale launches they do (similar problem HTC now faces).


I'm sure Microsoft would welcome HTC and give them support if they're serious about WP phones.


They could even broker a deal which would see Nokia and HTC drop their litigation and move forward together against Android.

The combined volume of Nokia+HTC would be meaningful and provide a counterweight to Samsung and Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Nelson
by MOS6510 on Wed 22nd May 2013 15:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Nelson"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I think they are doing well too, it's just that some (most?) people apparently think Nokia can switch to a new platform and have instant marketshare overnight.

My guess is Nokia now has a higher marketshare with WP than they would have had with Android. They would have made better phones than Samsung, but they don't have Samsung's well, let's call it "commitment" to marketing.

Still a bit annoyed about the WP7/8 thing being stuck on 7.8 now with my Lumia 800.

But it would be nice to see Nokia's with a Nokia designed operating system again.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Nelson
by Neolander on Thu 23rd May 2013 06:05 in reply to "RE: Comment by Nelson"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I think Nokia should have made their own OS, gone with WP or done both.

Certainly I agree Android was a no-go. It would reduce Nokia to just another phone maker, which would be sad for a company that was once synonymous with the mobile phone.

I'm sure Microsoft would welcome HTC and give them support if they're serious about WP phones.

+1 Insightful for mentioning the third option of Nokia growing their own OS.

That one was also possible at some point, they only blew it by letting the Symbian team stagnate, let their code rot, and impose their tyranny upon other teams.

It's such a shame to leave so many of these impressive OS projects Nokia had being left to rot, in favor of the latest Microsoft mobile failure of all things... Though I can agree that Android (or iOS for that matter, if it was possible to license it) wouldn't have done much better.

Reply Parent Score: 3