Linked by snydeq on Tue 4th Jun 2013 01:46 UTC
Windows First looks at Windows 'Blue' have revealed an upgrade composed of cosmetic fixes, suggesting that Microsoft may be blowing its chance to turn the tide on Windows 8 blow back, and make good on its promise to truly 'rethink' Windows 8 with the release of Windows Blue. As a result, InfoWorld has issued an open letter to Microsoft to consider Windows 'Red' -- what InfoWorld is calling a 'serious plan' to fix the flaws of Windows 8, one that could rescue Microsoft's currently flagging promise to deliver a modern computing experience on both PCs and tablets.
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Withholding judgement
by galvanash on Tue 4th Jun 2013 03:27 UTC
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

On first pass it seems overly complicated... Personally I would have to think quite a bit about what they are proposing to make an informed judgement, so Ill pass.

I would add one thing that I haven't seen said anywhere else so far. There is a lot of ink being spent reporting on how Windows 8.1 brings back the start button...

The problem is I don't think the start button is what people are really missing. It is the start menu.

Having a button that launches the Metro start screen is (imo) totally pointless - that is exactly the thing that desktop users don't want to see because it is a gut wrenching transition to something completely foreign that really is no better than what we had before (at least on desktops with mice)

I really do think the idea of Metro is great for its intended usage - I just think they screwed up by trying to integrate the two environments to such a degree.

I think the solution is even simpler than this "red" idea. Just disconnect the two environments completely. Metro apps live in Metro, and desktop apps live on the desktop. Make it simple to switch between the two environments, but keep them completely separate. Let the user decide when and if they want to switch between environments and be done with it.

Why not?

Edited 2013-06-04 03:28 UTC

Reply Score: 10

RE: Withholding judgement
by Nelson on Tue 4th Jun 2013 14:11 in reply to "Withholding judgement"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


The problem is I don't think the start button is what people are really missing. It is the start menu.

Having a button that launches the Metro start screen is (imo) totally pointless - that is exactly the thing that desktop users don't want to see because it is a gut wrenching transition to something completely foreign that really is no better than what we had before (at least on desktops with mice)


Actually, I think this is a decent balance. It is arguable that some people are trained to recognize and look for the start button, and expect it to do exactly what it does in Windows Blue, take them to their apps.

I also like that unless you actually use the Button, it will not stay visible at all times. Thank God.

Blue gives you the option to forego the Start Screen and be transitioned directly into an "All Apps" screen which has options for filtering through your apps.

It is basically a full screen start menu. Which is the exact same situation we have in Windows 7. When you use the Start Menu, you don't get to interact with the rest of the Desktop in a meaningful manner (or else it dismisses the Menu). Windows 8.1 just uses this space more efficiently and shows you more content.



I think the solution is even simpler than this "red" idea. Just disconnect the two environments completely. Metro apps live in Metro, and desktop apps live on the desktop. Make it simple to switch between the two environments, but keep them completely separate. Let the user decide when and if they want to switch between environments and be done with it.

Why not?


This is pretty much how it exists today, I honestly don't interact with, and am not bothered by the Metro shell while I'm working inside Visual Studio on the Desktop.

Windows 8.1 makes the transition between the two environments less jarring (Sharing wallpaper between Desktop+Start Menu, more settings options in Metro making transitions less frequent, more snap states for apps enabling better workflows)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Withholding judgement
by Fergy on Tue 4th Jun 2013 18:11 in reply to "RE: Withholding judgement"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

It is basically a full screen start menu. Which is the exact same situation we have in Windows 7. When you use the Start Menu, you don't get to interact with the rest of the Desktop in a meaningful manner (or else it dismisses the Menu). Windows 8.1 just uses this space more efficiently and shows you more content.

You just lost any credibility you might have had. The startmenu is a small menu so you only have to focus on a small part of the screen. At the same time you don't have to move your mouse a lot. The startmenu has your most used actions and applications in one small list.

With the startscreen you have to scan across you monitor to find the actions and applications you are looking for. It has multiple tabs like applications, settings and files that you have to click. Settings even shows a blank screen. You cannot customize startscreen to a useful state. Startscreen is dumber than startmenu because it has no idea what you are trying to do.
Let's face it: it is meant for touch on a small screen. Android would be horrible on my 24 inch.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Withholding judgement
by Lurking_Grue on Fri 7th Jun 2013 16:27 in reply to "RE: Withholding judgement"
Lurking_Grue Member since:
2013-03-15

My biggest issue with windows 8 isn't the start screen so much as the full screen thing.

I just don't want full screen apps.

Same goes for the start screen.

Reply Parent Score: 1