Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Nov 2005 17:51 UTC, submitted by AdriAn Avila
Novell and Ximian Rumors circulating that Novell is going to kill off its popular Linux desktop lines are completely false. [However,] Novell is making one large strategic change. The GNOME interface is going to become the default interface on both the SLES and Novell Linux Desktop line. KDE libraries will be supplied on both, but the bulk of Novell's interface moving forward will be on GNOME. "The entire KDE graphical interface and product family will continue to be supported and delivered on OpenSuSE."
Thread beginning with comment 56420
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Why I moved from KDE to Gnome
by on Sat 5th Nov 2005 18:26 UTC

Member since:

Way back when I first used Linux I tried Mandrake and it was installed with KDE as the default desktop. After trying Gnome 2.12 on Fedora 4 I fell in love with it. Man has Gnome improved a lot. I recently removed KDE as a startup option since I found I didn't need it anymore. I find the latest version of Nautilus is cleaner than KDE's Konqueror. I use Firefox for browsing so I dropped Konqueror. I think other people and Novell have caught onto these improvements and there is always that KDE licensing problem with applications. I don't think the majority of KDE users are aware that developers making commercial applications have to pay a royalty if they use the QT toolkit. For me this is a good enough reason to avoid KDE.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why I moved from KDE to Gnome
by on Sat 5th Nov 2005 19:23 in reply to "Why I moved from KDE to Gnome"
Member since:

"I don't think the majority of KDE users are aware that developers making commercial applications have to pay a royalty if they use the QT toolkit. For me this is a good enough reason to avoid KDE."

Correct me if i'm wrong, but I believe there is an option to avoid royaltoes IF and only IF you release your program under the GPL. In that cae I fully agree and understand that commercial distros move away from KDE.

/Lennart Fridén

Reply Parent Score: 0

somebody Member since:
2005-07-07

Yes, you are right. Anything else but GPL app requires you to buy commercial development license.

And prices are insane. Insane high, I mean.
http://www.trolltech.com/products/qt/pricing.html

Not everyone writes GPL software, there is much more shareware than freeware, and how can one afford to even think about proffit if he has to pay 2630EUR for one workstation development desktop license? Well, in case of buying some comercial product you get cheaper license, but that doesn't mean that you can use newer Qt if any.

For example Kylix is still at Qt 2.0 (ok, there is a FreeCLX project that will support newer, but... read forward to know why but exists here) and owners of older licenses will be able to write commercial apps with 2.0 only where it doesn't matter if 4.0 is out. But on the other hand these same people will be able to write GPL software with 4? Wow, that is a real deal for anybody who bought Kylix, basically he can stick FreeCLX somewhere where the sun doesn't shine if he would like to write closed applications.

Life sucks, doesn't it?

Reply Parent Score: 3

CrimsonScythe Member since:
2005-07-10

There are no royalties involved if you code with Qt. To quote the KDE myths page:

There are no per-product or per-sale fees associated with Qt development on X11, Windows or MacOS X, open or closed source.

You do have to pay a per-developer license fee, however horrible it is to have to pay for service and support. It must really suck having to spend money to make money...

Reply Parent Score: 1