Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 8th Jun 2013 14:57 UTC
Legal And yes, the PRISM scandal is far, far from over. More and more information keeps leaking out, and the more gets out, the worse it gets. The companies involved have sent out official statements - often by mouth of their CEOs - and what's interesting is that not only are these official statements eerily similar to each other, using the same terms clearly designed by lawyers, they also directly contradict new reports from The New York Times. So, who is lying?
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Genuine shock?
by M.Onty on Mon 10th Jun 2013 10:13 UTC
M.Onty
Member since:
2009-10-23

I wonder how many Facebook/Google/&c. users are genuinely shocked by the revelation that their data is being passed around with arrogant ease? I feel there must be a word, phrase or cautionary tale to better describe this mentality, but I can't think of it. So I'll say its the false bravado of someone who's been ignoring what he has always expected was going on, and now its been shoved in his face feels the need to react angrily to save face.

Why the hell did anyone think cloud backup services exist? Of course its not the best way of getting large amounts of data (i.e. larger than an address book) to sync across devices. If that were the real intention then we'd be sold bluetooth memory bracelets or somesuch that would do it locally in a fraction of the time. Honestly gov, your files are taken to California and back for your own benefit. The hard drives grow better out here due to the favourable climate, donchaknow.

I'm not being flippant or saying I-told-them-but-would-they-listen. I really think that the majority of those users don't value their own data or privacy, so long as its stripped away from them gently and quietly. After all, many of these services are 'sold' to the user as a way of more efficiently advertising yourself to and measuring yourself against your 'friends' by means of witty updates & constant peer scrutiny. Now we've been reminded of what losing your privacy can actually signify the rush is on to pretend its always meant something to us.

I'm glad the PRISM programme exists and is being publicly discussed. Hopefully bringing the subject into Airstrip One territory will make a few more people remember the value of privacy.

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