Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Jun 2013 17:07 UTC
Apple We already talked about iOS 7 yesterday (after a night of sleep, it's only looking worse and worse - look at this, for Fiona's sake!), so now it's time to talk about the downright stunning and belly flutters-inducing new Mac Pro. As former owner and huge, huge, huge fan of the PowerMac G4 Cube - I haven't been this excited about an Apple product since, well, I would say the iMac G4. This is the Apple I used to love.
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RE: I think it's exciting
by tylerdurden on Tue 11th Jun 2013 18:49 UTC in reply to "I think it's exciting"
tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

The "10 year" apple refers to has nothing to do with the specs of this specific model being "relevant and current" for a decade, or each machine being an investment that can be used for 10 years by the consumer.

They refer to the basic architecture of the system being of use for apple for at least 10 years. I personally think that is not the case, since it is a single socket architecture, and thus not very scalable for the professional market.

The external expansion, however, makes a lot of sense: customers can keep their drive arrays and all their data, as well as some PCI-expansion chassis for low bandwidth devices that they may have made an investment on. And simply "upgrade" to a newer "cylinder" when there is a new CPU/GPU combo available by simply swapping the processing cylinder to a newer revision.

I should caution that "it makes sense" depends on the price point Apple under which apple ends up delivering these machines. My guess it that the device will be too expensive, and as such... most of the value proposition of this architecture will be rendered moot.

Edited 2013-06-11 18:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I think it's exciting
by whartung on Tue 11th Jun 2013 20:37 in reply to "RE: I think it's exciting"
whartung Member since:
2005-07-06

The "10 year" apple refers to has nothing to do with the specs of this specific model being "relevant and current" for a decade, or each machine being an investment that can be used for 10 years by the consumer.

They refer to the basic architecture of the system being of use for apple for at least 10 years. I personally think that is not the case, since it is a single socket architecture, and thus not very scalable for the professional market.


You're confusing Apples 10 year with my 10 year. My 10 year is exactly that, my 10 years. 10 years on my desk -- unrelated to Apple. The basic premise being that the interfaces on that machine were not going away any time soon. The capacity of the machine would be enough to last 10 years (at the time, 2TB internals hard drive + 16GB of RAM, but the hard drives have crushed the 2TB barrier), and while CPU were getting faster, they weren't getting that much faster that quickly. Simply we were topping out the curve of CPU performance that in 10 years it wouldn't be a 8088 at 4.77Mhz. The CPUs would be "fast enough" for 10 years.

All this remained true to form. The only unexpected thing was the 32-bit video sub system that Apple obsoleted in OS X.8, Mountain Lion, when it mandated 64b for everything, all the time. I think the next gen Mac Pro fixed that issue.

So, I'm just not sure if this machine would well serve a consumer for 10 years. 5 easy, just not sure about 10. Were it not for the 32b video subsystem, my first gen Pro would have easily.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: I think it's exciting
by tylerdurden on Tue 11th Jun 2013 20:45 in reply to "RE[2]: I think it's exciting"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Sorry, I misread your comment I guess.

Still 10 years out of the same machine, in a field which advances almost exponentially seems not that feasible. Of course that depends on usage patterns for the machine...

Reply Parent Score: 2