Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th Jun 2013 17:33 UTC
Google "There's a leaked Android 4.3 Jelly Bean ROM out in the wild this morning, in the form of a pre-release build for the 'Google Play edition' Galaxy S4. It's also been ported to the European LTE Galaxy S4 (GT-i9505) in the form of a custom ROM, courtesy of the original source of the leak, Samsung fansite SamMobile. We've fired up that ROM on our European GS4 and shot a quick hands-on video, giving an early glimpse of the next version of Android." Few changes.
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RE[2]: What a surprise !
by Kochise on Sat 29th Jun 2013 07:13 UTC in reply to "RE: What a surprise !"
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

I have an Android 4.x capable hardware that the OEM decided not to update after Android... 2.3. Go figure. Of course, no ROM source code available, no datasheet, the OEM just decided to abandon the platform.

Fragmentation ? What can Google do to force OEM to upgrade their various Android implementations and keep them up to date ? Nothing.

Would it be easier for OEMs to upgrade from Android 4.x to 5.0, will(ing) they do it ? No sure, because Android 5.0 will add a value to the new devices sold with, and OEMs have to sell new devices, not support old ones. That's HTC's fate and misfortune.

So my Android 2.3 device will never know Android 4, even less Android 5. So what's the point of making "little steps" ?

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: What a surprise !
by Sodki on Sat 29th Jun 2013 10:05 in reply to "RE[2]: What a surprise !"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

I have an Android 4.x capable hardware that the OEM decided not to update after Android... 2.3. Go figure. Of course, no ROM source code available, no datasheet, the OEM just decided to abandon the platform.


Unfortunately that is the norm for cell phones. Personally, I prefer to buy a Nexus device or another device that I know is supported by third parties, like CyanogenMod, but I know that is not always possible.

Just curious, what is the model of your phone?

Edited 2013-06-29 10:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: What a surprise !
by Kochise on Sat 29th Jun 2013 10:54 in reply to "RE[3]: What a surprise !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Not a phone, a 7" mini PC using a WM8650 @ 1GHz.

For my phone, a HTC Evo 3D GSM, I use CyanogenMod 10.1 Jelly Bean 4.2.2, but no more 3D, since that's HTC's private binary blob stuff.

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: What a surprise !
by cmost on Sun 30th Jun 2013 17:27 in reply to "RE[3]: What a surprise !"
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

"I have an Android 4.x capable hardware that the OEM decided not to update after Android... 2.3. Go figure. Of course, no ROM source code available, no datasheet, the OEM just decided to abandon the platform.


Unfortunately that is the norm for cell phones. Personally, I prefer to buy a Nexus device or another device that I know is supported by third parties, like CyanogenMod, but I know that is not always possible.

Just curious, what is the model of your phone?
"

Exactly!!! I only purchase Nexus devices. I had a Nexus One and currently own a Galaxy Nexus. I for one am very excited about Google offering Nexus versions of flagship devices Samsung Galaxy 4 and the HTC One. The build quality of the latter is really something; I can't say that I've ever seen a more attractive device. The Nexus One was an HTC handset and I found its quality far superior to Samsung's offerings.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: What a surprise !
by jrockey on Mon 1st Jul 2013 09:42 in reply to "RE[2]: What a surprise !"
jrockey Member since:
2012-11-06

[q]Fragmentation ? What can Google do to force OEM to upgrade their various Android implementations and keep them up to date ? Nothing.
/q]

Well, quite. Google can't force this. Hence, it's a market. If you want up-to-date Androids, go with Nexus or a manufacturer with a good track record of updates. Customers have a choice. This is why Android is a good thing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Fragmentation ? What can Google do to force OEM to upgrade their various Android implementations and keep them up to date ? Nothing.


True. What Google can do, is reduce the number of features that are introduced in new versions of android to make it easier for OEM to upgrade their various Android implementations. Hopefully, the easier it is to do, the more OEMs will actually do it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: What a surprise !
by Kochise on Mon 1st Jul 2013 20:03 in reply to "RE[3]: What a surprise !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

It will reduce the gap between the Android versions, but it will not force OEMs to upgrade if they don't want to. They will still pretend the hardware is not capable enough. Or they are delaying the release because they are doing a thoughtfully testing for 3 years to keep the user experience level. Or simply focusing on just new products.

It at least they opened their specs...

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2