Linked by David Adams on Sun 14th Jul 2013 17:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A perennial question that revolves around Nokia is: why didn't it choose to go with Android to replace Symbian when it decided to kill that as its smartphone operating system in late 2010?
Thread beginning with comment 567148
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
winter skies
Member since:
2009-08-21

This is a lie, Nelson, and you know it. Up until Elop announced the switch, Symbian sales were rising.
[...]

You know this, because I mentioned it twice and you commented on both stories. Why purposely lie?


Because anything different wouldn't be functional to his narration. "Nokia needed Microsoft, Nokia couldn't have done anything alone, Elop made the right moves for Nokia, his strategy was a success".
Any fact like "Nokia was selling more than ever before the memo" or "Nokia was a large, successful global company which was dismembered and shrinked to a smallish OEM losing any hope of being independent in order to seem profitable again" doesn't fit in this theory and thus must not be taken into account.

Sorry for the harshness, but it is clear this partnership makes absolute sense when seen from Microsoft's point of view, while it makes close to zero sense from Nokia's.

Reply Parent Score: 7

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

" This is a lie, Nelson, and you know it. Up until Elop announced the switch, Symbian sales were rising.
[...]

You know this, because I mentioned it twice and you commented on both stories. Why purposely lie?


Because anything different wouldn't be functional to his narration. "Nokia needed Microsoft, Nokia couldn't have done anything alone, Elop made the right moves for Nokia, his strategy was a success".
Any fact like "Nokia was selling more than ever before the memo" or "Nokia was a large, successful global company which was dismembered and shrinked to a smallish OEM losing any hope of being independent in order to seem profitable again" doesn't fit in this theory and thus must not be taken into account.

Sorry for the harshness, but it is clear this partnership makes absolute sense when seen from Microsoft's point of view, while it makes close to zero sense from Nokia's.
"

I eagerly await your response to my post below, wise one.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Here, wise one.

"Nokia’s market share is in death-spiral, crashed from 39% to 28% in just six months and warnings from management suggest Q1 will continue the bad news, so it may end somewhere near 24% by end of March and who knows where the bottom is.“
Tomi Ahonen, January 31, 2011

Facts are stubborn things.

Reply Parent Score: 2