Linked by David Adams on Sun 14th Jul 2013 17:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A perennial question that revolves around Nokia is: why didn't it choose to go with Android to replace Symbian when it decided to kill that as its smartphone operating system in late 2010?
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hhas
Member since:
2006-11-28

Dude, you said "Symbian sales were collapsing a full quarter prior to the Windows Phone announcement", which was incorrect: they were rising in that quarter. What you should have said was "Symbian market share was collapsing, which was the point Tomi Ahonen was making, and something I suspect Thom is conveniently overlooking.

Sales != market share; a distinction that seems to be lost on both of you, and other ideologically motivated commenters too. If your sales rise by X% but your (similarly sized) competitors' sales rise by 5X% in the same period, then your sales are increasing but your share of the total market is decreasing. Your revenue may still be healthy today (assuming you're maintaining a healthy margin on those sales), but a few years from now those now much larger and more powerful competitors start swallowing your sales as well.

I wish folks on these threads would go takes some business classes and come back once they understand the world beyond bits and bytes. The quality of comments would be immeasurably improved by it.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Uh, I didn't overlook anything - I actually said the exact same thing you did.

Reply Parent Score: 1

hhas Member since:
2006-11-28

Nelson is obviously wrong on a simple statement; you, however, are being highly misleading by subtler omission.

You point to 2010's increase in Symbian sales, thereby implying Nokia were actually doing alright prior to the burning memo. What you conveniently omit to mention is that Nokia's market share was simultaneously plummeting:

http://www.techegypt.com/upload/World-Wide-Smartphone-Market-Share....

Provide the full context, and it's easy to see why Ahonen was rightly crapping it in January 2011: Nokia was in major trouble a full year before Elop so publicly pointed it out.

Had Nelson said "Nokia's market share was plummeting" instead of "Nokia's sales were plummeting", his post would've been absolutely dead on the mark, but while he screwed up on the wording at least he correctly gauged just how much trouble Nokia was in prior to the burning memo.

Whereas, your response may be technically accurate, but (whether by accident or intent) is a textbook demonstration of the classic "lies, damned lies, and statistics" axiom in action. It's just a shame Mr Elop didn't follow your example back at the time. :p

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Symbian sales can be collapsing relative to where they should be, especially if they lag behind the market so significantly. Given the size of Nokia at the time, it exacerbated the problem.

I think its a nit pick at worst, but sure, you're right.

Reply Parent Score: 2

hhas Member since:
2006-11-28

Symbian sales can be collapsing relative to where they should be, especially if they lag behind the market so significantly. Given the size of Nokia at the time, it exacerbated the problem.


Now you're just equivocating. You didn't check all your own arguments were accurate before presenting them, and your sloppiness gave ideological opponents an ideal excuse to dismiss your entire post - including the valid parts - on that one technical error alone.

I think its a nit pick at worst, but sure, you're right.


As you may have noticed, you are a bit of a WinPhone fanboy and the audience round here isn't exactly sympathetic to either one.

Confess your 'mea culpa', restate the argument correctly, and remember in future to check your homework fully before you hand it in. :p

Reply Parent Score: 3