Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 19th Jul 2013 12:47 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The biggest mobile developer study in history with 6,000 respondents from 115 countries says that while iOS developers make an average of $5,200 per month in app revenue and Android developers pull in $4,700, more developers plan to start developing for Windows Phone than any other platform. [...] That's aided, of course, by the fact that 71 percent of mobile developers are already developing for Android, and 56 percent are already developing for iOS." I'm surprised there's so little difference between income for iOS and Android developers. Reading the web, it often seems as if all iOS developers are millionaires and Android developers are poor unwashed peasants. Reality is, clearly, different.
Thread beginning with comment 567520
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Finally some clarity.
by flypig on Fri 19th Jul 2013 18:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Finally some clarity."
flypig
Member since:
2005-07-13

So where are all these awesome Android apps? They sure don't seem to be abundantly available for the Nexus 7, which I always assumed was a mildly popular device. Are most of the popular money-making Android apps limited to games?

I guess it would be interesting to know which apps you paid for on the iPhone. I'd be curious to know the reasons why you didn't pay for similar software on your Nexus (e.g. unavailability, functionality not needed, etc.).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Finally some clarity.
by gan17 on Fri 19th Jul 2013 20:14 in reply to "RE[2]: Finally some clarity."
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

I guess it would be interesting to know which apps you paid for on the iPhone. I'd be curious to know the reasons why you didn't pay for similar software on your Nexus (e.g. unavailability, functionality not needed, etc.).

Off the top of my head cos my phone's charging in the bedroom and I'm lazy to walk all the way there,...

Around 5 are camera apps, so I'll make an exemption since the Nexus 7 has no rear camera anyway, but I last I checked, none of them were available for Android either. I would've killed for something like Camera Noir or Instant back when I had the Galaxy Nexus.

A couple of typography apps, one of which is called Crispy - it adds typography to images/photos - and is great for on-the-fly composition, prelim ideas and stuff. Useful since I work in an ad/design agency.

A few more image enhancement apps, Mextures being my current fave. Not essential, but fun and somewhat useful. I've used a couple of the edited images for my company's Pinterest and Facebook pages, as a matter of fact. The closest I've seen available on Android with regards to results is Autodesk's Pixlr Express (also available on iOS) but that one doesn't have a couple of nice features that Mextures provides.

A very cool app called Isometric which I bought just last week, which creates geometric artwork and optical illusion-esque images. Great for idea generation, and I've already used some of the generated images as bedrock for actual design jobs with Illustrator. Also used random generated images to replace all the photos for people on my contact list, cos people aren't usually photogenic... lol.

About a dozen music-making/editing/sampling apps, almost all unavailable on Android - I really did bother searching since I though some would just be more useable on the Nexus 7's larger screen, but no luck - due to everlasting audio latency issues. Some just fun electronica apps from Propellerhead and Native Instruments for playing around, but some of those from Korg and Roland are quite useful for idea generation (music for ads and stuff, even though that's not my department), while some have become almost essential for jamming/chilling at home on the guitar, like the Tunable, Jamn and Groove Metronome. There are a couple of alternatives to the tuner app (Tunable) in Android, but none are as good as the ones for iOS.

I'll admit that I have paid for about a dozen apps that are simply alternatives to stock iOS apps, like Fantastical or Mail or that cool gesture based alarm clock app, and I'm also willing to admit that Google Now on the Nexus 7 would do an equally good job for a few of those needs, but the fact remains that these apps were nice/polished enough to make me want to pay for them on iOS, an urge I don't seem to get when browsing the Play Store or Android websites. I suppose half the problem lies with me, in that I tend to ignore Android apps that aren't Holo, simply because the overall look and feel of current Android almost forces you to adopt a Holo-looking "app lifestyle", for lack of better term, but that's also the dev's fault for not updating their apps. iOS 7 isn't even out yet and you already have devs rushing to update their apps, while Android has had the Holo-look since ICS and some key apps are still stuck in pseud-Holo (meaning only Holo in appearance, not in use) or Gingerbread land.

I've could go on, really. There's still more than a page full of iOS paid apps I haven't talked about, but I think you get my gist, and I've bored you enough as it is already.

Obviously a subjective thing, I realize. An Android modder would argue that he/she gets all the cool homescreen and launcher apps like Apex and Nova, but how many of those can a single user justify paying for?

So to answer your question, or just TL;DR if you've just glanced through my long dreary post; It's a combination of the 3 points you mention - unavailable, functionality, not needed - plus a few more like level of polish, Android version not as good, aesthetics & cool/fun-factor.

Jeez that was long. I seem to have too much free time today. :/ ... Sorry

Edited 2013-07-19 20:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Finally some clarity.
by flypig on Fri 19th Jul 2013 21:23 in reply to "RE[3]: Finally some clarity."
flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

... Sorry

Hey, absolutely no need to apologise. That made interesting reading and I'm glad you took the time to go into detail!

It sounds like there are some really valid areas (design and audio) where Android is less impressive than iOS. I'm sure there are others who find the opposite for some alternative area, but I'm afraid I'm not qualified to judge.

However it does also seem like enthusiasm plays an important part. Personally I'm still searching for really innovative and unexpected Apps on either Android or iOS, but I should probably search a bit harder! Your post has inspired me to take another look.

Reply Parent Score: 4