Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 19th Jul 2013 15:23 UTC
Humor "Surprise, surprise, a certain Korean company copies more of Apple's product design. When Apple launched the iPad mini in October 2012, Apple explained the design: the almost 8" screen size and thin border allow one-handed use. Now, the new 8" Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 has the same border design as the iPad mini." From what I can only assume is the The Onion of technology reporting. I love humour like this on a lazy Friday afternoon.
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Price, and state of the art
by Lobotomik on Sat 20th Jul 2013 17:28 UTC
Lobotomik
Member since:
2006-01-03

Oh, please, neither Apple nor Samsung are responsible for thin bezels!

It is obvious that dead space is undesirable in your handheld device - the most compact your device is, with the same size screen, the better.

Now, ultra thin bezel, ultra high resolution, ultra low consumption or ultra highbrightness LCD SCREENS are bound to be more expensive than, say, cheaper screens. Apple selling at sky high prices can afford to BUY those screens earlier than no name chinese tablet makers. But they buy them from a manufacturer who sells them in the open market, be it Toshiba, LG, or maybe even Samsung.

Like Mercedes comes up with cars with Bosch ABS and airbags, and Hyundai follows suite later. It is Bosch who innovated! Only, Mercedes could afford it earlier.

Using expensive components that are commercially available might make you a luxury brand, not an innovation powerhouse. Apple is only a luxury brand. They did innovation (mixed with healthy copying) in the past, but now they do polishing and branding (and a healthy dose of copying, too). Like Mercedes. That's fine, if you want it and can afford it, but let's not be carried away with admiration.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Price, and state of the art
by Treza on Sat 20th Jul 2013 17:49 in reply to "Price, and state of the art "
Treza Member since:
2006-01-11

Maybe dead space is undesirable.
At the same time, there must be some place on "handheld" devices where you could put your fingers to _hold_ the thingy in your _hand_.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Maybe dead space is undesirable.
At the same time, there must be some place on "handheld" devices where you could put your fingers to _hold_ the thingy in your _hand_.


I'd assume the development illustrated in the following article would be interesting to be judged regarding "handheld device = a device you hold (and use) in your hand"...

http://www.behance.net/gallery/iPhone-6-An-edgy-concept/7617209

I've seen "unintended behaviour" of smartphones and other handheld devices, with loud complaining of the owners and users, when "improperly" holding the device or handing it over to someone else, like "Look, this is the photo I took!" or "Here, you can write that message yourself." If you use 100 % of any surface of a device for interaction (means: touch-based input, not just visible output), problems can appear.

Reply Parent Score: 3

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Using expensive components that are commercially available might make you a luxury brand, not an innovation powerhouse. Apple is only a luxury brand. They did innovation (mixed with healthy copying) in the past, but now they do polishing and branding (and a healthy dose of copying, too). Like Mercedes. That's fine, if you want it and can afford it, but let's not be carried away with admiration.


Mercedes is genuine innovator - they introduced crumple zones, inertia reel seatbelts, anti-burst door locks and hundreds of other safety innovations. In the vast majority of cases these innovations were developed in conjunction with partner companies using Mercedes funding. MB has always allowed competitors to access their safety patents at no cost after a short delay.

Mercedes is first and foremost an engineering company. MB requires senior managers to be PhD qualified mechanical engineers. A marketing or finance executive would never become CEO of MB. MB has never been a "luxury" car company (MB Cars are are well engineered - not luxurious. Even the most expensive S-Class models are quite spartan). Their main business is making trucks, buses and commercial vehicles.

Reply Parent Score: 3