Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 29th Jul 2013 21:19 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia's vice president Bryan Biniak: "We are trying to evolve the cultural thinking [at Microsoft] to say 'time is of the essence'. Waiting until the end of your fiscal year when you need to close your targets, doesn't do us any good when I have phones to sell today." Later Biniak adds: "As a company we don't want to rely on somebody else and sit and wait for them to get it right." There was a simple solution to this problem.
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RE[3]: Comment by Luminair
by Nelson on Tue 30th Jul 2013 11:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Luminair"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

This has zero to do with Nokias financials and more to do with Microsoft's corporate culture.

God forbid I actually know how to read a financial report. I've been consistently on target with how I think Nokia will do, whereas you, well you don't take a concrete position so its hard to tell.

Anyway, Microsoft needs to pick up the pace.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Luminair
by lemur2 on Tue 30th Jul 2013 11:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Luminair"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Microsoft needs to pick up the pace.


It won't make any difference. People don't want Microsoft product, and in mobile and tablets they can buy market-leading gear that doesn't have it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Luminair
by Nelson on Tue 30th Jul 2013 11:57 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Luminair"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

http://infogr.am/Nokia-Lumia-sales

Clearly nobody wants Microsoft products. Nokia has increased volumes sequentially for every quarter except one of the Lumia's availability.

What reality do you live in?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by Luminair
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 30th Jul 2013 14:04 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Luminair"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Anyway, Microsoft needs to pick up the pace.

And if they don't? Would you admit that Nokia (specifically, Elop) fucked themselves over hardcore? All I see according to the article is Microsoft screwing up and dragging their feet around with Windows Phone... and that is nothing new. It's also nothing new that Nokia is hurting over this. I don't need to read financial reports to tell me that:

1. Microsoft has been screwing up their phone platform forever now, and
2. Elop has made Nokia a Microsoft-only shop, despite the above fact.

I'm sure Microsoft loves their former employee for the loyalty he expressed by locking an entire phone hardware company into their operating system, but you'd think that after all this time they'd have already repaid him by supplying his company with a workable product that people (hardware manufacturers, phone customers) expect. But no--and now even Nokia's admitting that they're feeling the heat from the fact that Elop got them stuck between a rock and a hard place by making them dependent on Microsoft, and their well-being is effectively in the hands of Elop's partner.

Nokia screwed up. Now it's up to Microsoft to determine their fate, or for Nokia to consider a plan B. Nokia doesn't appear to be going anywhere fast.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Comment by Luminair
by Nelson on Tue 30th Jul 2013 14:12 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Luminair"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

If they don't, then yes I will. Nokia for their part is doing all they can. That much is obvious.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Luminair
by cdude on Tue 30th Jul 2013 16:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Luminair"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Anyway, Microsoft needs to pick up the pace.
And if they don't?

No what if, they don't what lead to the strong public critic raised by Nokia now. Read the interview. According to Nokia Microsoft was all in for the first half of 2012 and stopped since then. Why? Connect the dots.

Would you admit that Nokia (specifically, Elop) f--ked themselves over hardcore?

Its not that big secret that reasons human and financial resources are removed is that, for Microsoft, the WP strategy did not work out. It failed and behind the scene work towards an alternate strategy goes on. That's where resources where shifted to.

I suspect Microsoft aborting negotiations with Nokia has the same reason. Microsoft is working on an alternate strategy since more then a year now. Maybe a Windows Phone 9 bundled with a Surface Phone. I think we will see soon and Nokia may well aware of it what is why they raise public voices now.

This isn't any longer a warning, its a loud Nokia-investors alarm-bell ringing here. Microsoft may show off there new strategy soon and Nokia will be sidelined.

Edited 2013-07-30 16:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3