Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 2nd Aug 2013 15:30 UTC
Apple
Apple Inc deserves a five-year ban from entering anti-competitive e-book distribution contracts and should end its business arrangements with five major publishers with which it conspired to raise e-book prices, federal and state regulators said on Friday.

The U.S. Department of Justice and 33 U.S. states and territories proposed those changes after U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan last month found in a civil antitrust case that Apple played a "central role" in a conspiracy with the publishers to raise e-book prices.

The DoJ also requires that competitors such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble be allowed to include links to their own stores in their iOS applications, which Apple had prohibited.

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Good
by Alfman on Fri 2nd Aug 2013 18:14 UTC
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

"The DoJ also requires that competitors such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble be allowed to include links to their own stores in their iOS applications, which Apple had prohibited."


Am I right in thinking that apple were the only ones to have had this sort of limitation in the first place? I hate that government intervention was even necessary, but it's a good outcome since apple shouldn't be banning apps from linking to their own websites.

It reminds me of this whole crap with banning dropbox apps on account of them linking to the website.

http://mobileorchard.com/apple-bans-apps-that-integrate-with-dropbo...

It at least could be understandable if apple were blocking illegal / "unethical" links (whatever that means), but banning them in order to block users from clicking on sites that might be used for commercial transactions goes way too far into anti-competitive territory.

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