Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Aug 2013 13:12 UTC
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. today announced that Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer has decided to retire as CEO within the next 12 months, upon the completion of a process to choose his successor. In the meantime, Ballmer will continue as CEO and will lead Microsoft through the next steps of its transformation to a devices and services company that empowers people for the activities they value most.

“There is never a perfect time for this type of transition, but now is the right time,” Ballmer said. “We have embarked on a new strategy with a new organization and we have an amazing Senior Leadership Team. My original thoughts on timing would have had my retirement happen in the middle of our company’s transformation to a devices and services company. We need a CEO who will be here longer term for this new direction.”

This was long overdue. Microsoft needs fresh blood at the top - not a salesman, but a visionary.

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Treza
Member since:
2006-01-11

Microsoft needs to offer compelling reasons to upgrade.


By obsoleting quickly old versions of the OS and stop releasing security patches.
They could even create date limited OSes.

My company is currently transitioning from XP to Seven only because XP will stop being supported next year.

Of course, it only concern enterprises. Home PCs are never upgraded and it is an endangered specie.

Enhancing the OS ? Nobody cares. The OS does not exist, a PC is a thingy for running Office and IE.

Reply Parent Score: 4

fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

By obsoleting quickly old versions of the OS and stop releasing security patches.
They could even create date limited OSes.


So you're advocating that they decrease support and degrade the OS further to force upgrades? As an Apple shareholder, I fully approve. I'm sure that most Linux fans would be equally happy about that.

My company is currently transitioning from XP to Seven only because XP will stop being supported next year.

That's because the new versions of Windows did not offer features or functionality that gave your company a reason to upgrade.

Of course, it only concern enterprises. Home PCs are never upgraded and it is an endangered specie.

Macs are upgraded. Want to know which version of OS X has the largest installed base? It's the most recent one -- Mountain Lion. That's because Apple charges a reasonable price and makes upgrades that improve the user experience.

Enhancing the OS ? Nobody cares. The OS does not exist, a PC is a thingy for running Office and IE.

I switched from the PC to the Mac because the Windows OS simply changed without actually improving. Bad and outdated ideas continued to be proliferated from version to version. This is coming from someone who started using Windows back in the 2.0 days.

Want to know when an OS exists? It exists when the user's computer becomes infected with malware. It exists when his hard drive crashes and he realizes that he can't recover because Windows has no backup comparable to Time Machine. It exists when his Windows computer starts taking ten minutes to boot. It exists when an application that ran two months ago no longer runs now and he has no idea if it's due to an overwritten DLL, a corrupt registry, or some OS update that. It exists when he's in a hurry to shut off his PC and Windows decides that it's going to spend fifteen minutes installing updates. It exists when every time he powers one, the system blue-screens and he has to pay "The Geek Squad" $200 only to have them reformat his hard drive and reinstall the OS.

Linux users upgrade. OS X users upgrade. Windows users don't. Because Windows upgrades are too expensive, usually require hardware upgrades, and, in some cases, have even required reformatting the hard drive. And for all of that effort, they really don't reward with actual improvements that justify the cost, time, and effort.

Edited 2013-08-25 21:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Treza Member since:
2006-01-11

To be clear, I am not _advocating_ anything. Both my personal PCs run Linux. I only tolerate Windows in a virtual machine.

In a way, I have the impression that some efforts that Microsoft exercised to prevent piracy have helped making upgrading the OS complex for users. Obviously, their plan is to allow upgrades through application stores in a controlled environment...

Windows architecture made restarting from scratch every 3 years something desirable for home users. They buy a Windows re-install which includes a PC. Driver support has always be terrible for users anyway, so new PCs come with new OSes and new OSes are only compatible with new PCs.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

"Of course, it only concern enterprises. Home PCs are never upgraded and it is an endangered specie."

Macs are upgraded. Want to know which version of OS X has the largest installed base? It's the most recent one -- Mountain Lion. That's because Apple charges a reasonable price and makes upgrades that improve the user experience.

I wouldn't bet on it.

Though this is admittedly anecdotal evidence, non-geek Mac users around me tend to upgrade their OS about as often as their Windows counterpard. That is, only when their tech support begs to let them do it.

The reason being that OS upgrades tend to break some software compatibility and user habits. And even if OSX does indeed a better job at avoiding it than other OSs, in sense that breaking stuff always seems to be done on purpose, it is still not totally exempt from this problem.

Some examples of user-disturbing changes in OSX off the top of my head:
=> Dropping PPC compatibility and breaking Quicktime API compatibility in Snow Leopard
=> Strongly raising hardware requirements, spreading kitsch visuals everywhere, hiding scroll bars, and reversing scrolling direction in Lion
=> Disturbing software installation with Gatekeeper and dropping official X11.app support in Mountain Lion

Also, the App Store-only requirement put on OSX upgrades since Lion probably put even more people away from upgrading, since not everyone has a fast and reliable Internet connection or wants to open an App Store account.

Edited 2013-08-26 07:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2