Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Sep 2013 22:09 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless The Verge on the Galaxy Gear:

There are a couple of significant downsides that temper my enthusiasm for the new Gear. First and foremost is the speed and intuitiveness of the user interface - or rather, the lack thereof. There's a tangible lag to anything you do with the Gear, while the swipe gestures are hard to figure out and do different things depending on where you are in the menus.

[...]

Also important will be the Galaxy Gear's battery life. It does use the Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy standard to communicate, but at 315mAh its battery is decidedly small. Samsung promises "about a day" of endurance from the Gear, but by the end of our briefing with the company, the cameras on most of its demo units were refusing to turn on due to the watches running low on power.

Yeah, no. I don't know what a smartwatch is, but this, is not it.

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Re:
by kurkosdr on Wed 4th Sep 2013 23:06 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

I lost interest when I heard about the one day battery life. As if having to charge my phone every night wasn't annoying enough.

And AMOLED? In order for AMOLEDs to be readable under sunlight (so this thing can function as a watch) they have to draw battery like there is no tommorow.

At least Qualcomm were smart enough to equip their smartwatch with an e-ink display.

PS: Anyway, this is probably good, because Samsung is getting a bit arrogant lately and a flop is needed to put them back in their senses.

Edited 2013-09-04 23:09 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Re:
by kwan_e on Thu 5th Sep 2013 04:02 in reply to "Re:"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I lost interest when I heard about the one day battery life. As if having to charge my phone every night wasn't annoying enough.

And AMOLED? In order for AMOLEDs to be readable under sunlight (so this thing can function as a watch) they have to draw battery like there is no tommorow.


I wonder what Samsung is doing wrong. I have a Cowon J3 media player that has an AMOLED screen the size of a phone. I can get more than two days out of it if I had it on the whole day.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Re:
by Fergy on Thu 5th Sep 2013 17:25 in reply to "RE: Re:"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

I wonder what Samsung is doing wrong. I have a Cowon J3 media player that has an AMOLED screen the size of a phone. I can get more than two days out of it if I had it on the whole day.

Do you watch movies on it? Because if you barely use the screen it doesn't matter if it is a CRT.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Re:
by Nelson on Fri 6th Sep 2013 00:53 in reply to "RE: Re:"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

It depends on the type of content used on the device. Smartphones see a lot of webbrowsing which tend to use brighter backgrounds (whites on OLEDs burn more power than whites on LCDs iirc).

But at the scale we're talking (smartwatches with tiny batteries) e-Ink (and mirasol) are probably better fits for the power profile.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Re:
by benytocamela on Sat 7th Sep 2013 07:43 in reply to "RE: Re:"
benytocamela Member since:
2013-05-16

You may be comparing apples to bananas

Your MP3 player has, perhaps, a larger battery, it uses a very very low end processor or perhaps just an asic, and probably does not have any type of radio.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Re:
by No it isnt on Thu 5th Sep 2013 16:34 in reply to "Re:"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Actually, you're wrong about AMOLED. Nokia's ClearBlack makes them perfectly readable in sunlight, even at low brightness (but not quite as low as the lock screen on the N9 uses). But yes, some sort of e-ink would be much better.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Re:
by Nelson on Fri 6th Sep 2013 00:50 in reply to "RE: Re:"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Actually, you're wrong about AMOLED. Nokia's ClearBlack makes them perfectly readable in sunlight, even at low brightness (but not quite as low as the lock screen on the N9 uses). But yes, some sort of e-ink would be much better.


That works to a limited extent, the Lumia 920 for example comes with "super bright mode" which temporarily cranks up the screen brightness beyond even what the Windows Phone settings allow and make the screen perfectly readable in sunlight.

There's probably (for now) no better way to do it than cranking up the brightness and using up more energy. I'd say its a decent trade off for a smartphone, but for a watch maybe not so much.

Mirasol is promising, but that's really conceptware still. I think smartwatches might be the greatest use case for it.

Reply Parent Score: 2