Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 9th Sep 2013 21:22 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
X11, Window Managers Intel on Ubuntu's XMir:

We do not condone or support Canonical in the course of action they have chosen, and will not carry XMir patches upstream.

Ubuntu has to do virtually all its work on Xmir drivers by itself. No one else supports it.

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RE: Comment by aaronb
by silviucc on Mon 9th Sep 2013 22:09 UTC in reply to "Comment by aaronb"
silviucc
Member since:
2009-12-05

Well, technically Intel is invested heavily in Wayland. Hah, nice use of the word "technically" ;)

Anyway, this only means that Canonical has a bit more work on their hands. It's basically people telling them something along the lines of "You want Mir instead of Wayland then make it work yourselves".

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by aaronb
by Hiev on Mon 9th Sep 2013 22:13 in reply to "RE: Comment by aaronb"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

We do not condone or support Canonical in the course of action they have chosen

That is to vague, what are they *exactly* not condoning?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by shmerl on Mon 9th Sep 2013 22:36 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Using Mir while there is Wayland which all distros except Unbuntu want to build upon. Intel sees no point in Canonical making a diversion.

Edited 2013-09-09 22:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by Auzy on Mon 9th Sep 2013 23:48 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
Auzy Member since:
2008-01-20

If I had to fathom a guess, I'd be guessing its because everyone else is backing Wayland at the moment, and, Mir is simply going to fragment the community.

Also, I believe that Ubuntu originally backed Wayland, but changed their mind.

This is actually a VERY good move long term for Linux. Yes it will make things bad for Ubuntu. However, as both Mir and Wayland uses different code, supporting both would lead to a significant amount of development hours wasted globally (which could be spent on making Linux more competitive, and bringing wayland up to parity with Xorg).

I also believe that Wayland was announced ages before Mir. If this is true, it is irresponsible for Canonical to steam ahead with their own solution.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by l3v1 on Tue 10th Sep 2013 07:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

That is to vague, what are they *exactly* not condoning?


Well, my guess would be that if it'd be too much work to support just one 'fork' over the other dozens on the wayland path, then it's not worth the effort. If, given some miracle, mir would take off and become popular, then they just might reconsider later.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by fewt on Tue 10th Sep 2013 12:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
fewt Member since:
2010-06-09

We've traditionally had one display server.

First we had XFree86, but that was forked to become Xorg. Later the Xorg developers decided to write a new display server to replace Xorg since some of the code was so poor that they couldn't even understand how it worked. They went on to create Wayland.

Canonical initially announced support and that they would immediately begin work towards Unity on Wayland. Later, after a year of secret development they announced Mir along with an article full of lies to sell Mir to the public.

Intel is most likely not condoning Canonical's attempt to fragment the display server, and also their deceitful marketing practices..

Mir is not being developed in the interests of the community, and lives in a bubble where any contributions only really benefit Canonical. Intel and many other companies and people work to develop and support Wayland in the spirit of the community so it is not surprising at all that Intel would push this code back down to Ubuntu where it belongs.

Mir is a single distribution solution so xMir code doesn't belong upstream.

I would have done the same thing.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by aaronb
by darknexus on Tue 10th Sep 2013 00:09 in reply to "RE: Comment by aaronb"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Anyway, this only means that Canonical has a bit more work on their hands. It's basically people telling them something along the lines of "You want Mir instead of Wayland then make it work yourselves".

Yep, and Canonical will do just that, resulting in graphics libraries needing to support two new backends instead of one, and neither will be done well. Fucking wonderful!

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by shmerl on Tue 10th Sep 2013 00:19 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Everyone, except Canonical I guess, expected Mir to cause a major mess for the global Linux community. Did Canonical care?

Edited 2013-09-10 00:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by aaronb
by WorknMan on Tue 10th Sep 2013 00:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by aaronb"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Yep, and Canonical will do just that, resulting in graphics libraries needing to support two new backends instead of one, and neither will be done well. f--king wonderful!


Yup, when you live in the FOSS world, this is exactly what happens. If you want the code to be open and allow people to do whatever the hell they want with it, don't get too butt-hurt when they do just that.

This is what kills Linux on the desktop. Since you don't have a person or group in charge of the ship, it just kind of wanders all over the place with no real direction. Even if you get 99% of the community going in the same direction, all it takes is the other 1% to screw it up, esp if that 1% happens to have a lot of $$.

Edited 2013-09-10 00:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4