Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Sep 2013 22:04 UTC, submitted by garyd
General Development

ZFS is the world's most advanced filesystem, in active development for over a decade. Recent development has continued in the open, and OpenZFS is the new formal name for this open community of developers, users, and companies improving, using, and building on ZFS. Founded by members of the Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, and illumos communities, including Matt Ahrens, one of the two original authors of ZFS, the OpenZFS community brings together over a hundred software developers from these platforms.

ZFS plays a major role in Solaris, of course, but beyond that, has it found other major homes? In fact, now that we're at it, how is Solaris doing anyway?

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Comment by porcel
by porcel on Wed 18th Sep 2013 08:52 UTC
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

It sounds interesting, but I doubt anything much will change since the license remains the same: CDDL.

This has been debated before, so there is no point in rehashing the arguments, but the truth of the matter is that the impact of ZFS will remain minimal until it can be safely integrated into all major distributions at installation time.

In other words, until major Linux distributions support it on a root install and will honor support contracts where ZFS is used, I doubt it will gain much traction, among other things, because right now ext4 is "good enough" for lots of people and very safe.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by porcel
by pfgbsd on Wed 18th Sep 2013 15:52 in reply to "Comment by porcel"
pfgbsd Member since:
2011-03-12

It sounds interesting, but I doubt anything much will change since the license remains the same: CDDL.


The code already has suficient third party contributions that Oracle cannot unilaterally change the license even if they wanted to.

OTOH, if the code could be made GPL that would be great for linux but bad for the filesystem: FreeBSD and probably even illumos would have to fork it for license reasons and the code in the linux tree would rapidly develop linuxisms that would make a central vendor-independent distribution very difficult anyways.

This said, there is nothing legally stopping Linus from importing CDDL'd code, it's just the NIH sindrome.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Comment by porcel
by ssokolow on Wed 18th Sep 2013 18:24 in reply to "RE: Comment by porcel"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

The code already has suficient third party contributions that Oracle cannot unilaterally change the license even if they wanted to.

OTOH, if the code could be made GPL that would be great for linux but bad for the filesystem: FreeBSD and probably even illumos would have to fork it for license reasons and the code in the linux tree would rapidly develop linuxisms that would make a central vendor-independent distribution very difficult anyways.

This said, there is nothing legally stopping Linus from importing CDDL'd code, it's just the NIH sindrome.


Got a citation for that? According to Wikipedia, Danese Cooper said at DebConf 2006 that the CDDL was specifically designed to be GPL-incompatible because the Solaris devs didn't want their best work to just get gobbled up by Linux when OpenSolaris was released.

Edited 2013-09-18 18:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7