Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th Sep 2013 16:57 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

Still, the Nokia N9 and its MeeGo Harmattan software platform remain unmatched in various aspects of user interface and user experience. Even though MeeGo Harmattan has essentially remained stagnant and frozen in time for 2 whole years, it still represents a benchmark in some ways for what a smartphone user interface should be.

Virtually every N9 owner I've ever talked to loves the N9 unconditionally. It could have been the Eve of Nokia's resurrection. Instead, it became the symbol of its demise.

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I don't love mine unconditionally
by No it isnt on Fri 27th Sep 2013 17:24 UTC
No it isnt
Member since:
2005-11-14

The N9 has some flaws. The most serious one is the browser, which was poor when the phone was new. Certainly worse than IE is now, but who knows what Nokia could have made of it if they just tried. Also, the hardware is a bit slow.

The UI is decent enough, but it's too easy to swipe an app to the background if the app itself has a swiping interface (like maps). It should have used upward swipes to send them to the background, and downwards to close.

It's still the coolest phone I've ever seen, though, and very functional right out of the box. Skype? Google voice and video chat? You don't need an app for that (Skype is video-less, though).

Reply Score: 3

anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

The N9 has some flaws. The most serious one is the browser, which was poor when the phone was new.


True. I really like everything else though ;)

It can easily be used with one hand, the Swype keyboard is great, it is extremely sturdy due to how it is manufactured.

Oh, and of course it has an exceptional battery life.
Mine is now two years old and I charge it every fourth day!

Reply Parent Score: 6

Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

I actually went back to using the N9 as my primary phone because the browser was a lot better than what was in my Android and Blackberry10 phones. Well, at least the browser played a part of going back, the other part was Nokia maps. Just can't deal with shitty GPS after using a N9.

Reply Parent Score: 4

gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

I actually went back to using the N9 as my primary phone because the browser was a lot better than what was in my Android and Blackberry10 phones.

The browser on the N9 was much better than anything on Android at the time, imho. In fact it's probably still smoother than Chrome on my Nexus 7 in many cases.

I haven't touched my N9 (made in Finland, btw) ever since I got an iPhone 5 last year, but it remains nicely stored in it's box inside my storage cabinet.

One standout feature of Meego Harmattan on the N9 was the haptic feedback. It felt like the vibrations were coming from that exact point you were touching on screen. No other touchscreen phone I've used has come close to mimicking that, not even Windows Phone on similar Lumia hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 4

sicofante Member since:
2009-07-08

After much longing for an N9, I finally bought one, but had to let it go. (Actually I bought it for my wife and we both used it for a while.)

The browser is what I (and my wife) use 99% of the time with a phone. The N9's native one is close to useless, IMO. Firefox is behind useless on the N9. But I'm very happy with Opera on my E52, so I installed it on the N9, only to discover it's not a native app there, and doesn't even use the N9's stellar keyboard. No way we were going to use it like that, and since hopes for a better browser would remain close to zero, we had to let it go.

I'm sad, because I think the N9 is one of the best -if not the best- design ever, both hardware and software wise. It was just murdered by this soul-less idiot who dismantled the whole company (making a few dollars for Nelson, I know, I know) for Microsoft. (I hope anyone finds a way to sue that bastard and the board altogether.)

I just can't understand why no one else has achieved haptic feedback but the N9 developers. What's so hard about it? Why doesn't even Nokia get it on Windows phones? I have some hope that the Jolla team has done it right again, although their whole design is far from what the N9 was.

Edited 2013-09-28 23:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

You can use Firefox there.

Reply Parent Score: 1

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Yes, but it's incredibly sluggish. There was some work on getting it ported to Qt, but I'm not sure it's in a usable state yet. A browser is a big project.

Reply Parent Score: 2