Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 7th Nov 2005 00:10 UTC, submitted by Rob Teng
Mandriva, Mandrake, Lycoris In light of the many misunderstandings about Linux, software repositories and installation of packages, part one of this season's Mandriva Linux 2006 review includes an extensive background article about it. It explains why the nature of Free Software leads to a more userfriendly software installation setup for Linux distributions in general, as compared to proprietary systems such as the current desktop market leader. The process is illustrated with Mandriva Linux tools. This first part of the Mandriva Linux 2006 review also contains information on the installation and benchmark figures against previous Mandriva/Mandrake products, amongst other things.
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RE[8]: thumbs down
by Temcat on Mon 7th Nov 2005 16:37 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: thumbs down"
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

The answer is simple enough : ask your distro provider or the app provider for a package.

Sure, and they of course will drop all the rest of their present affairs and devote their attention to me :-)

I've had that trouble myself. My distro only had Gimp 2.0 while I wanted to install 2.2. I asked them to no avail. So the repo system failed for me in this case. "Change your distro" is not the answer.

BTW you seem to somehow infer that I deny usefulness of repositories as such. That's not the case. The repos have their place and they are a great convenience for the user. At least for the core system software, they are clearly superior to the Windows' auto update system. But they do have their limitations: 1) inherent security of all software from repositories (EDIT: compared to the upstream versions) is a myth; 2) they don't contain ALL software that is produced, and the software they do contain does not always have the version a user needs.

Edited 2005-11-07 16:41

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: thumbs down
by on Mon 7th Nov 2005 17:14 in reply to "RE[8]: thumbs down"
Member since:

Sure, and they of course will drop all the rest of their present affairs and devote their attention to me :-)

Yes, an end user distro, for which you paid, provides support. It's not news, especially for Mandriva.

I've had that trouble myself. My distro only had Gimp 2.0 while I wanted to install 2.2. I asked them to no avail.

You mean that to this day, they still do not have Gimp 2.2 ? Anyway, this has nothing to do with a flaw in the repos system. It still protects you from bad packages. You surely can find a non-official package, but you lose the safety of your distro provider.

So the repo system failed for me in this case. "Change your distro" is not the answer.

No it didn't, the only thing I see that failed here is your patience. Wait patiently is the answer. You can't have the cake and eat it too. A bleeding edge distro is not the same as an average user distro. Most distro even allow you to access their bleeding edge repos, but they warn you that you are no longer safe from broken packages, and must know what you are doing. So the repos is not at fault, your thirst for bleeding edge is.

But they do have their limitations:
1) inherent security of all software from repositories (EDIT: compared to the upstream versions) is a myth; 2) they don't contain ALL software that is produced, and the software they do contain does not always have the version a user needs.


Your point 1 is present in non-repo install too. But worse, perhaps it's a myth, but for now it's a fact. I already provided examples of people who tried to infect repository, they were detected and repelled.
So to this day, what you call a myth is still a fact.
In point 2, you make the mistake of "version a user needs", when you really think "bleeding edge version".
Being what it is, in FOSS, the latest version is (nearly) always the best with the most features. But it is bleeding edge and not always stable (not that it crashes, but API or calling arguments can change for example). Anyway, the version the user need will make its way to the distro one day.
Distro try to have a balance between stable and bleeding edge. When you master Linux more, you can then try bleeding edge distro, that still use repos, and can have the latest software version the day it's released (like mine or gentoo). We still use repos though, but our packages use the upstream to get the software.
So the repos never fail.
The only drawback of repos is that they have to be maintained.

Reply Parent Score: 0