Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Oct 2013 09:48 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

I think many who extol Android's flexibility fall into the tinkerer category, including some tech bloggers. They love all the ways they can customize their phones, not because they're seeking some perfect setup, but because they can swap in a new launcher every week. That's fun for them; but they've made the mistake of not understanding how their motivation differs from the rest of us.

A whopping 70%-80% of the world's smartphone owners have opted for Android over iOS. You could easily argue that 3-4 years ago, when Android was brand new, that it was for early adopters and tinkerers. To still trot out this ridiculous characterisation now that Android is on the vast majority of smartphones sold is borderline insanity.

Choice is not Android's problem. People who assume out of a misplaced arrogance that they represent the average consumer are the problem.

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RE[3]: Comment by bbap
by WereCatf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 17:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by bbap"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

I would say that a problem with Android isn't "choice". It's too much choice.


I don't quite get this claim. It's no different from TVs, cars, bikes, computers and so on, they all have a bajillion different choices and yet only Android-phones are singled out. Why is it "too much" of choice when it comes to cellphones, but nowhere else? I certainly have never heard anyone complain about there being too many phones to choose from, they just go for whichever looks the most appealing to them.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by bbap
by darknexus on Wed 16th Oct 2013 20:17 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by bbap"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I don't quite get this claim. It's no different from TVs, cars, bikes, computers and so on, they all have a bajillion different choices and yet only Android-phones are singled out. Why is it "too much" of choice when it comes to cellphones, but nowhere else? I certainly have never heard anyone complain about there being too many phones to choose from, they just go for whichever looks the most appealing to them.

And here come the inevitably flawed car analogies. Here's the essential difference: cars and/or bikes all have to conform to a baseline standard. The steering wheel turns the wheels, This is the throttle and this the breaks, the throttle increases the flow of gas and the breaks stop the wheels, etc. This is why car analogies don't work for technology. There are no such baselines by which we can compare one phone, for example to another phone.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by bbap
by WereCatf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 20:51 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by bbap"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

And here come the inevitably flawed car analogies. Here's the essential difference: cars and/or bikes all have to conform to a baseline standard. The steering wheel turns the wheels, This is the throttle and this the breaks, the throttle increases the flow of gas and the breaks stop the wheels, etc. This is why car analogies don't work for technology. There are no such baselines by which we can compare one phone, for example to another phone.


Actually, I still don't see the difference. There is a baseline standard to phones, too: you need to be able to make and receive phone-calls and do messaging.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by bbap
by Nelson on Wed 16th Oct 2013 21:47 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by bbap"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I think it boils down to an expectation. People expect their mobile devices to behave a certain way. Predictable performance, good user experience, good battery life (well..).

You compromise on those expectations a bit with too much openness. There are no rigid hardware guidelines so the quality of applications suffer as a result. There are phones loaded to the brim with carrier shitware so the experience suffers. OEMs get to drag their feet on updates so security suffers and the investment the consumer made is wasted.

Its arguable how much of an impact those have on the purchasing decisions vs how much of a difference the lack of friction in the channel makes. Google makes Android easy to sell, but not necessarily universally enjoyable to use.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by bbap
by dukes on Wed 16th Oct 2013 22:26 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by bbap"
dukes Member since:
2005-07-06

"I would say that a problem with Android isn't "choice". It's too much choice.


I don't quite get this claim. It's no different from TVs, cars, bikes, computers and so on, they all have a bajillion different choices and yet only Android-phones are singled out. Why is it "too much" of choice when it comes to cellphones, but nowhere else? I certainly have never heard anyone complain about there being too many phones to choose from, they just go for whichever looks the most appealing to them.
"

My comment wasn't just about cellphones. It deals with everything. I even provided a link. Guess you didn't see it.

Reply Parent Score: 2