Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 23rd Oct 2013 22:46 UTC
Windows

Early this year, I decided to take a risk.

As a geek, I like to reward those in the industry that try to be bold. That try to be different. That try to leave the beaten path. That look at the norm in the market, and decide to ignore it. Despite all its flaws, Microsoft did just that with its Metro user interface, incarnations of which are used on both Windows Phone and Windows 8.

I was a Windows Phone user since day one. I bought an HTC HD7 somewhere around release day, and imported it into The Netherlands, a year before the platform became available in The Netherlands. I wanted to reward Microsoft's mobile team for trying to be different, for being original, for not copying iOS and Android and instead coming up with something fresh and unique. Despite all the limitations and early adopter issues, I loved it.

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Comment by leos
by leos on Thu 24th Oct 2013 05:02 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

The lack of progress on Windows phone is completely mystifying to me. How is it that a company with those kind of resources simply cannot do anything interesting in all that time? I just don't get it. Are they just too big to move quickly anymore?

As for Windows RT, if it wasn't dead already, Haswell and the new Atoms would have put the final nail in its coffin. RT was useful when the RT hardware could have twice the battery life and less weight than the x86 hardware. Now the gap is much smaller and you can get decent intel-based mobiles with low power usage the argument is much weaker why you should give up 20 years of application compatibility for a few less ounces.

Reply Score: 9

RE: Comment by leos
by ilovebeer on Thu 24th Oct 2013 05:35 in reply to "Comment by leos"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

The lack of progress on Windows phone is completely mystifying to me. How is it that a company with those kind of resources simply cannot do anything interesting in all that time? I just don't get it. Are they just too big to move quickly anymore?

I don't live far from the main Microsoft campus. Yes, the place is big -- enormous. I know several people who work there at all different levels. The best stuff Microsoft has to offer goes to the military, or gets shelved for no apparent reason other than internal politics and plain stupidity. They have a lot of really cool stuff behind the curtain but why they don't do anything with it is bewildering.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE: Comment by leos
by twitterfire on Thu 24th Oct 2013 07:13 in reply to "Comment by leos"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

WHy should you buy a Windows tablet with x86 CPU? There aren't enough good Metro apps. You can run x86 desktop apps, but them a netbook or small laptop would be more suitable. If you want a tablet, an Android tablet would be better.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by leos
by Temcat on Thu 24th Oct 2013 07:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by leos"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

I for one would like a dual-booting Android-Windows (not RT) tablet. With a proper dual boot, not Android in a VM. Because sometimes I want to be able to get some work done where it's not feasible with a laptop due to the size or position, AND I want a tablet with good touch apps.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by leos
by cdude on Thu 24th Oct 2013 15:45 in reply to "RE: Comment by leos"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

So, why did Microsoft not improve win32 touch and input in all these years but had come up with a highly incompatible new stack and UI concept? Aborting your whole lockin, the ecosystem, and start a new one from scratch at a time you are already under heavy competative pressure is not a wise decision but a panic reaction. It is more worse. The new stack is not only incompatible to the old large ecosystem but even incompatible to itself between devices and versions. Add the horrible UI concept on top, the CE aborting, the WP7 abortion, burn your own platform again and again, end like Nokia.

Why is that that after a decade of unique success with a productline once real competition shows up a panic attack goes through upper management that leads to aborting the productline rather then improving it?

Edited 2013-10-24 15:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by leos
by leos on Thu 24th Oct 2013 19:56 in reply to "RE: Comment by leos"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

WHy should you buy a Windows tablet with x86 CPU? There aren't enough good Metro apps. You can run x86 desktop apps, but them a netbook or small laptop would be more suitable. If you want a tablet, an Android tablet would be better.


If I want a tablet I would buy an iPad, but that's not the point. The point is given the choice between Windows RT on an ARM tablet and Windows 8.1 on an x86 tablet, the x86 tablet is not as far behind in battery life and power usage as it used to be. I have an Asus tablet with Windows 8 at work that is approximately the same size and weight as an iPad, runs an Atom processor that is relatively speedy, and gets about 8 hours of battery life.

There's no way I would chose Windows RT over that. On the intel tablet I can run any of my windows software, on the RT tablet I can't. Yes I would prefer a windows laptop to either of them but between the tablets I would definitely go intel.

Reply Parent Score: 3