Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Oct 2013 16:02 UTC, submitted by bowkota
Google

Google back in 2005:

There will be no banner ads on the Google homepage or web search results pages.

Google today:

The company confirmed to the Guardian that it is testing a system with about 30 advertisers in the US in which it shows banner ads for companies including SouthWest Airlines on pages which include them in web search results.

And people wonder why I have zero trust in companies.

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RE[5]: Comment by Tractor
by WereCatf on Fri 25th Oct 2013 12:39 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Tractor"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

Think about it: if you were a truck- or taxi-driver, do you expect to have a job in 5 years now Google and others are building self-driving cars ? And Uber makes it really easy to get a taxi where you want ?

--SNIP--

If you want to have a job, be a generalist and move up the stack. Maybe learn programming. Moore's Law will take away your job eventually. As Marc Andreessen says: Software is eating the world.


That's actually something I've thought about several times: sooner or later it's possible to automate anything that doesn't require creativity, and that means the only jobs left for real, living human beings would be the creative ones -- how much demand can there even be for that? Given how today's economy works would it be possible to earn enough money to sustain yourself in a world where almost everything is automated? And..how would the kinds of people fare in such a world that simply aren't creative?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Tractor
by Lennie on Fri 25th Oct 2013 12:43 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Tractor"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

That is where personalization comes in. It is on the rise in a big way.

Have a look at what Gabe Newell has to say about productivity, the economy, personalization, the corporation and political instituions:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Td_PGkfIdIQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhgOqyZHBIU

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Tractor
by Soulbender on Fri 25th Oct 2013 12:56 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Tractor"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Given how today's economy works would it be possible to earn enough money to sustain yourself in a world where almost everything is automated?


Well, in theory the massive increase in profits could be used to subsidize decent living for everyone. On the other hand, that's probably already possible and the main reason it's not happening is greed.
This discussion reminds me a bit of Childhoods End.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by Tractor
by Alfman on Fri 25th Oct 2013 18:18 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Tractor"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Soulbender,

"Well, in theory the massive increase in profits could be used to subsidize decent living for everyone. On the other hand, that's probably already possible and the main reason it's not happening is greed."

This is my thinking as well. We could technically automate everything under the sun such that there'd be very little need for humans to work and products becoming very cheap. However our current economic models would actually result in extreme poverty due to the fact that only a few companies would own all the capital and nobody else would have the means to compete with the machines. In order for fully automated society to work, it would have to imply some kind of shift to egalitarian economics where the means of production are collectively owned and the benefits reaped by switching to machines are fairly distributed to society at large.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Tractor
by unclefester on Sat 26th Oct 2013 03:12 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Tractor"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

That's actually something I've thought about several times: sooner or later it's possible to automate anything that doesn't require creativity, and that means the only jobs left for real, living human beings would be the creative ones -- how much demand can there even be for that? Given how today's economy works would it be possible to earn enough money to sustain yourself in a world where almost everything is automated? And..how would the kinds of people fare in such a world that simply aren't creative?


One of my friends owns an upmarket hair salon. She earns $2000-3000/week after costs. Her son is studying pharmacy. I know who has the best long term financial prospects - the hairdresser. Robotised pharmacies are already used in some US hospitals.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by Tractor
by Alfman on Sat 26th Oct 2013 04:07 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Tractor"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

unclefester,

"One of my friends owns an upmarket hair salon. She earns $2000-3000/week after costs."

I first read that as "per month" and thought that's pretty good. But re-read that "per week", 104k - 156k per year "after costs", wow... that kind of income makes it easy to become a millionaire!

"Robotised pharmacies are already used in some US hospitals."

I think it makes a lot of sense from an efficiency and reliability standpoint, however I suspect the main impediment is actually the law requiring drugs to be sold by certified pharmacists. Technically speaking selling drugs wouldn't require much more than a glorified vending machine with ATM-like authorizations. If the law gets updated, a lot of pharmacists could be made redundant in short order.


Something tells me the world is not ready for robotized hairdressers ;) However I do think we are ready for robotized chiefs, once the price of robots drops below that of the minimum wage kids working in the back, they're likely to be out of a job.

If I had money to throw at it I'm pretty confident that I could build a machine capable of doing a chef's job. It would be very efficient, timing all the ingredients to be ready at exactly the right moment. A customer might place an order online and know exactly when it would be ready. It could remember customer's meal preferences and reproduce them with utmost consistency.

Customer facing jobs aren't as likely to disappear. Take a bartender for example, there are already machines that can mix drinks, that's not such a hard problem technically, but something is lost in the ambiance when you get rid of the human element.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by Tractor
by JAlexoid on Mon 28th Oct 2013 13:36 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Tractor"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

And how many of these do we need? And how often? Most hairdressers are broke and some are highly valued artists.

Reply Parent Score: 2