Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Nov 2013 00:19 UTC
QNX

This is a quick demonstration of the QNX 1.4 megabyte floppy disk demo.

QNX is an advanced, compact, real-time operating system. This demo disk, released in 1999, fits the operating system, the "Photon MicroGUI", and the HTML 3 capable Voyager Web browser all on a single 1.4 meg disk!

So far no emulator or virtualizer I have tried will run this QNX demo 100%, so this is running on real hardware. The video is captured with a VGA capture device.

QNX is one of the most intriguing operating systems of all time. This demo disk is one of those things that, even today, blows my mind. Be sure to watch through the whole video, especially the part where extensions are downloaded and run from the web, all on a single 1.44 MB floppy.

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RE[4]: Comment by The123king
by lucas_maximus on Mon 11th Nov 2013 12:51 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by The123king"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I have several hardrives that have a Terabyte's worth of space each, I have a internet connection that can download a DVD within about 20 minutes.

Given this situation, I would rather they package as much as possible into the OS from the go then having to constantly nag me for the install DVD.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by The123king
by JAlexoid on Mon 11th Nov 2013 14:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by The123king"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

That internet connection and the fact that mobile storage has shrunk, thanks to SSDs, are two reasons why it makes no sense to have all the possible drivers.

However, I don't believe that it's the drivers that take up that much space.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I updated my GPU drivers on my work machine and the download from nvidia.com was about 200-250mb.

Removing the printer drivers from the Leopard install ISO from 7-8GB to less than 4GB so I didn't have to burn using a dual layer DVD. Plus I expect there is loads libs for backwards compatibility, art work, help files etc.

I recently wrote a small web app and after I included libraries from Amazon, the usual JS and CSS libs and I already had a solution that was about 12mb.

Edited 2013-11-11 16:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by The123king
by Drumhellar on Mon 11th Nov 2013 18:17 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by The123king"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Fast/reliable connections aren't always available, just as the Windows CD isn't always available.

Plus, a lot of users might not know to go to the Internet when their printer, or some random USB device, doesn't work.

I'd wager that these use cases are far, far more common than "Boy, I wish I had that extra 4 gigs, since the use of that space bothers me aesthetically."

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Comment by The123king
by Fergy on Tue 12th Nov 2013 09:59 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by The123king"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

I have several hardrives that have a Terabyte's worth of space each, I have a internet connection that can download a DVD within about 20 minutes.

Given this situation, I would rather they package as much as possible into the OS from the go then having to constantly nag me for the install DVD.

Weird how your argument refutes your own point. Your internet connection is 3+MB/s. The software you need is probably less than 100MB which is 30 seconds of downloadtime. At best you gain 30 seconds of precious time by having everything you ever might need installed and updated.

Reply Parent Score: 4