Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Nov 2013 21:35 UTC
Windows

The Verge reviews the giant Nokia Lumia 1520:

Samsung and others have proven that there is a market for giant smartphones, warts and all. But that doesn't mean that just any smartphone is better if it's bigger, and the 1520 is a prime example of that. It's bigger and faster than any other Windows Phone yet, but it's not necessarily a better Windows Phone because of that. If all you've ever wanted in life is a Lumia 925 with a magnifying glass on top of it, the 1520 is exactly that. It's a tour de force in resolution and speed, but it's not a great smartphone or even a great replacement for a tablet.

And yet, it'll be a better tablet than any Windows 8.1 RT device. There's something poetic about that.

Thread beginning with comment 577037
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Somehow I doubt it
by dvhh on Tue 19th Nov 2013 02:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Somehow I doubt it"
dvhh
Member since:
2006-03-20

Among the complains, is that Microsoft push a locked ecosystem on Windows RT, And that the break is only applicable to 3rd party dev (where office on RT exists in the Desktop space of RT).
Plus capitalizing on the "Windows" brand for tablet is not such a good strategy for building an ecosystem that breaks backward compatibility.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it
by moondevil on Tue 19th Nov 2013 07:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Somehow I doubt it"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Plus capitalizing on the "Windows" brand for tablet is not such a good strategy for building an ecosystem that breaks backward compatibility.


Apple did something similar.

I see Metro as Cocoa, with Win32 having the role of Carbon/ClassicOS (Blue Box).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Somehow I doubt it
by The123king on Tue 19th Nov 2013 17:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

But at least there was a clear distinction between Classic Mac and Mac OS X, and eventually their tablet and phone iOS. Whereas with Windows you have either Windows 8, which is backwards compatible, Windows RT, which isn't, and Windows Phone 8 which is almost an independent platform in it's own right. Such similarly named and similarly looking systems just lead to confusion...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it
by lucas_maximus on Tue 19th Nov 2013 08:17 in reply to "RE[2]: Somehow I doubt it"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I was having a conversation with the architect yesterday. He was saying he has 3 laptops 1 for work (Win 7), 1 home (Win 8) and a Chromebook.

He tends to the use the chromebook for pretty much everything and most of the dev is done in the cloud/remotely.

I been doing the same with Windows VMs. My main machine is pretty much just a thin client.

Personally I find it better to work this way and the old way of doing things (the official way at work) we are just bypassing because the rest of IT at work is just miles behind.

Edited 2013-11-19 08:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Somehow I doubt it
by moondevil on Tue 19th Nov 2013 09:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I been doing the same with Windows VMs. My main machine is pretty much just a thin client.


OS/360 is the new future!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Somehow I doubt it
by bnolsen on Tue 19th Nov 2013 20:30 in reply to "RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

Nice to see you finally caught up to the 1980s (hehe). I think the only time I worked local was when I was at hughes/raytheon working on solaris in the mid/late 90s. Builds were always fully distributed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it
by TBPrince on Tue 19th Nov 2013 22:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Somehow I doubt it"
TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, I don't think they would ever scrap a brand so strong as Windows is. It would be insane.

I think you cannot apply to Microsoft metrics used for other companies. No other company do all the stuff Microsoft does, in basically any possible IT market. And in most of them, they are successfull.

That forces them to play this game considering ALL their activities while most companies only try to protect one or two core businesses.

Microsoft is currently leading desktop, office, servers, consoles, services and development fields. At the same time they need to grow their phones and tablets divisions without harming other ones, plus their advertising / search engines platforms.

Not as easy as manufacturing iPhones/iPads and being completely irrelevant in anything else... I guess.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Somehow I doubt it
by tylerdurden on Wed 20th Nov 2013 03:04 in reply to "RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


Not as easy as manufacturing iPhones/iPads and being completely irrelevant in anything else... I guess.


Yeah, it's so "easy" that MS is letting Apple eat away the most profitable segment(s). What a charitable bunch...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Somehow I doubt it
by hamster on Wed 20th Nov 2013 08:01 in reply to "RE[3]: Somehow I doubt it"
hamster Member since:
2006-10-06


Microsoft is currently leading desktop, office, servers, consoles, services and development fields. At the same time they need to grow their phones and tablets divisions without harming other ones, plus their advertising / search engines platforms.


When did microsoft start to lead the server field? The last number i have seen was less then 40% markedshare in the server field, thats not leading in my world.

Appently they are loosing ground on the console aswell...

Reply Parent Score: 2