Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th Nov 2013 23:03 UTC
Microsoft

Microsoft has enlisted the reality-television series "Pawn Stars" in its ongoing campaign to bash rival Google.

An online video ad released Tuesday mimics the plot set up of "Pawn Stars," which features people toting precious or odd objects for appraisal at a Las Vegas pawn shop. In Microsoft's fictional telling, a woman is trying to trade in a Chromebook, a no-frills laptop powered by Google software.

"The only problem with Microsoft is they just have no taste, they have absolutely no taste."

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RE[2]: This reeks of desperation
by Morgan on Wed 27th Nov 2013 00:08 UTC in reply to "RE: This reeks of desperation"
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

I've used a Chromebook, and my immediate reaction was "wow, this is pretty sweet". Then I hit the brick wall the video talks about: No wifi means no apps. It's gotten better on that front recently with offline gmail and limited local storage; I tried Hexxeh's Chromium OS build on my netbook and those features mostly worked, but I still went back to Slackware after just a few days. If I ever end up with a "real" Chromebook I'll probably just wipe and install a more useful OS.

All that said, I live in a semi-rural area on the outskirts of Atlanta, so I'm not the target market for these devices anyway. Someone who is bathed in free wifi 24/7 would probably love it.

Reply Parent Score: 6

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I just have to question the wisdom of Microsoft getting its ass handed to them by an OS which has worse sales than Windows RT.

They may very well be fantastic little laptops at awesome prices.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I just have to question the wisdom of Microsoft getting its ass handed to them by an OS which has worse sales than Windows RT.


I agree, and I think RT is a good comparison point.

Hardware-wise, Chromebooks can be nice or they can be worse than first-gen netbooks. The Pixel is almost Apple-level nice, but the price is a huge turnoff. The sub-$300 Chromebooks are hit or miss, with a lot of misses.

I would definitely rather have an RT based device than a Chromebook, as the two stand today.

Reply Parent Score: 3

BlueofRainbow Member since:
2009-01-06

This hits the weakness common to all vendors - no exception (as far as I am aware).

Having web-apps and using cloud storage works fine in an urban area well served in all kings of wireless networking connections.

However - not so in a rural area.

Maybe, rather than trying to bash each others, Apple, Google, and Microsoft would be better (for us, the users), to come-up with a common API set capable of transparently dealing with the loss of wireless connectivity once one travels away from urban centers and major highways. That would be money well spent.

Reply Parent Score: 2

raboof Member since:
2005-07-24

come-up with a common API set capable of transparently dealing with the loss of wireless connectivity once one travels away from urban centers and major highways. That would be money well spent.


Have you checked out http://hood.ie/ ?

I haven't looked at the framework itself, but it specifically targets this scenario, and I hold the people behind it in very high regard.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tkeith Member since:
2010-09-01

I don't understand this argument really. If you don't have wifi, what is it you are doing on your computer? If I am not at home or at work, I'm not doing anything on my computer. Do you guys go out in the wilderness and need to do some spreadsheets or what?

I think for 90% of people, the only time they use their computer is when they would have internet. Still I think the models with 200MB free internet make a lot of sense, and in some cases don't cost much more.

Please stop this lame strawman argument.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Nothing lame or "strawman" about it, no matter how much you, with your narrow point of view, want it to be. Fact is, a Chromebook is a computer designed to be used strictly online. If you try to use one offline, it's no longer useful. On the contrary, if I take my netbook to a place with no internet, I can still do around 80% of what that computer's OS allows. I can do some coding, I can play games, I can write prose, I can edit graphics, and so on. With a Chromebook, no internet means nearly none of that is possible. On my netbook, no internet means a very minor inconvenience.

Think outside the box, there's more to the computing world than looking at cat pictures and trolling discussion groups.

Reply Parent Score: 3