Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th Nov 2013 23:03 UTC
Microsoft

Microsoft has enlisted the reality-television series "Pawn Stars" in its ongoing campaign to bash rival Google.

An online video ad released Tuesday mimics the plot set up of "Pawn Stars," which features people toting precious or odd objects for appraisal at a Las Vegas pawn shop. In Microsoft's fictional telling, a woman is trying to trade in a Chromebook, a no-frills laptop powered by Google software.

"The only problem with Microsoft is they just have no taste, they have absolutely no taste."

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RE[6]: This reeks of desperation
by Morgan on Fri 29th Nov 2013 19:35 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: This reeks of desperation"
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

That's actually not true. Chrome apps can use local storage


Look up, I actually said that too in my original comment above the one you replied to. But it's just not the same thing as a true, fully useful OS.

My point though, is that you're just not going to do any serious work with one sans internet. You're not going to do any real development, and I'd be nervous about trusting my WIP fiction and non-fiction projects to such a flaky device.

But again, I'm not the normal use-case for one of these. I'm much better served by a full OS, and I've already said that for people with reliable, 24/7 wifi wherever they go, a Chromebook is a great device.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zsekeres Member since:
2011-02-11

"That's actually not true. Chrome apps can use local storage


Look up, I actually said that too in my original comment above the one you replied to. But it's just not the same thing as a true, fully useful OS.
"
Apps != OS

- If a Chrome app does not offer offline operation it is not the fault of the OS.
- If a Windows application does not use network access (e.g. for updates) it is not the fault of the OS.

My point though, is that you're just not going to do any serious work with one sans internet. You're not going to do any real development, and I'd be nervous about trusting my WIP fiction and non-fiction projects to such a flaky device.

A Chromebook is by default flaky? I do not see why. If the SSD in a Windows netbook dies the work is lost just the same.

But again, I'm not the normal use-case for one of these. I'm much better served by a full OS, and I've already said that for people with reliable, 24/7 wifi wherever they go, a Chromebook is a great device.

So I can perfectly understand that a Chromebook does not work you. But I do think that it is a matter of available applications and not necessarily of the OS.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

- If a Chrome app does not offer offline operation it is not the fault of the OS.


On an OS that was never originally designed for offline operation, and had to be modified to provide it, yes it can be. I don't understand your insistence that Chrome OS is somehow meant to be a full, traditional desktop OS. It's not; it was designed from the beginning to be an online-only OS. Just because Google finally hacked together a kludgy persistence feature, due to overwhelming complaints, doesn't mean it's suddenly a full fledged general purpose OS. You seem to desperately want it to be something it isn't and was never meant to be. There's nothing wrong with Chrome OS being what it was made to be: An online-only (or now, online-mostly) OS. All I've ever said here is that it's not for everyone, which is true of any OS.

A Chromebook is by default flaky? I do not see why. If the SSD in a Windows netbook dies the work is lost just the same.


As the nature of a Chromebook is to be online all the time, and it doesn't work at its full potential when it's without wifi, yes it is a flaky device for doing important work. My statement had nothing to do with hardware reliability and everything to do with the inability of the OS to perform as it should despite loss of internet connection. I'm really not sure how you inferred SSD issues from that.

So I can perfectly understand that a Chromebook does not work you. But I do think that it is a matter of available applications and not necessarily of the OS.


Exactly: Applications that no longer become available when you lose internet is a problem. When the OS was designed to only run online applications, you have an ecosystem where the app you want to run offline may not have that functionality yet. That is a problem stemming from the design of the OS. Maybe one day the app you need to run offline will gain that functionality, but that's up to the developer. Meanwhile, a normal app running on a normal OS will function just fine, just as it always has.

Once more, you seem to think I hate or have something against Chromebooks. I don't; I think they are amazing little devices. But they simply aren't for everyone, and trying to argue that they are is a pointless waste of time.

Reply Parent Score: 2